anybody just paint it on/mixture...

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anybody just paint it on/mixture...

Postby Hoey » Mon Jun 30, 2008 4:03 pm

So after hearing how a friend of MS just paints it on, I decided to try this method out.

I mixed some Rit powder with acetone (I think I may want to rethink this practice?)
It was super light, and even after a few coats, it really wasn't as dark as I'd like it to be. Do you still get alot of powder that's not mixed in? Something tells me there may be something wrong with this.


With the soaking method, do you just use straight black to get a dark black?

Wow, that sounds like a rediculous question.

any and all help would of course be super appreciative.

thanks,

dave.
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Postby UpFromTheAshes » Mon Jun 30, 2008 5:00 pm

I've never seen painted-on dyes come out as dark or bold as dipped dyes.
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Postby ferretdance03 » Tue Jul 01, 2008 7:57 pm

UpFromTheAshes wrote:I've never seen painted-on dyes come out as dark or bold as dipped dyes.

I don't know his techniques, but check out Macklin on the odsa boards. His stuff is bold and vibrant; rockin' too boot!
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Postby twmccoy » Sun Jul 06, 2008 4:44 pm

All the dyes I've done have been painted on with powdered rit and acetone. I just mix it well beforehand. I paint it on thick and give it 2 or 3 coats. The only issue I've had is an uneven look, but the extra coats can eliminate that. No issues with light color either. Acetone makes things dark in a hurry.
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Postby The Euphoric Nightmare » Sun Jul 06, 2008 10:04 pm

The disc's I've brushed the dye on this is how...

I got those glass model paint containers, they hold about a quarter fluid ounce.
You can find them at any hobby shop that also sells model kits (cars, airplanes, etc...).
Don't buy the one's that have paint in them.
Get 5 or 6 (or the # of colors you have) of the one's with paint thinner.
Dump 1 of them out. You can use others to clean your brushes.
Rinse it out with water, the thinner is oily and won't allow the dye to transfer to a plastic disc very well.
Then fill it half full of powder Rit.
Fill the rest with acetone.
Put the lid on... :?
Shake it thoroghly (sp?).
Let the undissolved powder settle before using.

Notes:
When dipping the brush be very careful not to dip it into the undissolved powder. You don't want that on your brush.
Application should be done in a WELL VENTILATED area, like outside. Acetone highs suck donkey Image!!!

Once the acetone level starts getting near undissolved powder, just add a little more acetone and shake it up a bit.
I've no idea just how many times you can do this, I've done it four times to one color and I've not notice any thinning.

Darkness of color. That the nice thing about brushin it on.
You have hella control over how much is applied.
1 stroke will leave brush marks.
Many will leave a bold, solid color.
Have notice the dye fades quicker vs dippin, but both methods seamingly fade only to a certain point.
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Postby Leopard » Mon Jul 07, 2008 4:59 am

The Euphoric Nightmare wrote:Have notice the dye fades quicker vs dippin, but both methods seamingly fade only to a certain point.


solvent (acetone) = fade


when you add a solvent to your dye, it's breaking the seal of the plastic. as it sits in the plastic, it continues to sink deeper and bleed. you'll notice that older factory dyes have bled all the way through to the underside of the flight plate -- i've got older discs where the dye is darker on bottom than on top.

so when the dye bleeds INTO the plastic, it's further from the visible surface (on opaque plastic) and it looks like the color is fading. the reason that translucent plastic looks like it "takes" or "holds" dye better is ONLY because the visible surface goes all the way through the plastic. as the dye sinks deeper, it's still visible in clear plastic.

if you want your stuff to bleed more and fade more, by all means, dump on the acetone.

that's why any dye job using acetone will fade more and fade quicker than a dye using only heat. heat is a temporary and therefore better method of breaking the plastic's surface.
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Postby Fritz » Mon Jul 07, 2008 6:59 am

ZAMson wrote:
The Euphoric Nightmare wrote:Have notice the dye fades quicker vs dippin, but both methods seamingly fade only to a certain point.


solvent (acetone) = fade


when you add a solvent to your dye, it's breaking the seal of the plastic. as it sits in the plastic, it continues to sink deeper and bleed. you'll notice that older factory dyes have bled all the way through to the underside of the flight plate -- i've got older discs where the dye is darker on bottom than on top.

so when the dye bleeds INTO the plastic, it's further from the visible surface (on opaque plastic) and it looks like the color is fading. the reason that translucent plastic looks like it "takes" or "holds" dye better is ONLY because the visible surface goes all the way through the plastic. as the dye sinks deeper, it's still visible in clear plastic.

if you want your stuff to bleed more and fade more, by all means, dump on the acetone.

that's why any dye job using acetone will fade more and fade quicker than a dye using only heat. heat is a temporary and therefore better method of breaking the plastic's surface.


Yup, this is the only reason why I use Acetone sometimes. I want the dye to come out the bottom. Mostly, boiled Rit is good enough for me.
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Postby Hoey » Mon Jul 07, 2008 8:16 am

good stuff thanks guys... I think the mixture was probably a little weak for that first go around...

now that i somewhat have your attention...

I'd also like to start with those "spin dyes," can the same amount/ratio of mixture be used to achieve nice results, providing I'm using an eye dropper as a way to put it on the disc? Has any one had success with these types of "dyes?"
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Postby UpFromTheAshes » Wed Jul 09, 2008 8:38 am

bogies is dave wrote:I'd also like to start with those "spin dyes," can the same amount/ratio of mixture be used to achieve nice results, providing I'm using an eye dropper as a way to put it on the disc? Has any one had success with these types of "dyes?"


I've always wondered about spin dyes. The above statements about multiple brushed-on coats clearly can't apply to spin dyes. What type of mixture are they using that gets decently dark colors with a single drop/streak of dye? I wonder if they apply heat at all during the spinning process.
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Postby Hoey » Wed Jul 09, 2008 8:55 am

UpFromTheAshes wrote:
bogies is dave wrote:I'd also like to start with those "spin dyes," can the same amount/ratio of mixture be used to achieve nice results, providing I'm using an eye dropper as a way to put it on the disc? Has any one had success with these types of "dyes?"


I've always wondered about spin dyes. The above statements about multiple brushed-on coats clearly can't apply to spin dyes. What type of mixture are they using that gets decently dark colors with a single drop/streak of dye? I wonder if they apply heat at all during the spinning process.


Well I'm glad I'm not the only one...

patiently waiting for any drop of insight...
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Postby SkaBob » Wed Jul 09, 2008 9:28 am

I'm curious too! it's the only reason I still keep around my craptastic old turntable!
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Postby Hoey » Wed Jul 09, 2008 9:59 am

SkaBob wrote:I'm curious too! it's the only reason I still keep around my craptastic old turntable!


that's funny... we pulled out a turntable that is bigger than some piano's I've seen for the same reason...
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Postby ChUcK » Fri Jul 11, 2008 12:08 am

bogies is dave wrote:
I'd also like to start with those "spin dyes," can the same amount/ratio of mixture be used to achieve nice results, providing I'm using an eye dropper as a way to put it on the disc? Has any one had success with these types of "dyes?"


I think a lot of dyes that are thought of as "spin" dyes are actually discs that have dye dropped on them and then blown with air or something equivalent. If the disc was spinning when dye was applied the dye would leave spiraled streaks. A lot of the factory dyes I've seen have straight lines extending towards the rim, indicating that the disc was stationary while dye was applied.

However, there are a lot of spin dyes out there too.
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Postby Leopard » Fri Jul 11, 2008 12:47 am

agreed... most of what i see is an air blast technique. dye + solvent mix and a blowdryer. lots of "fake spin" dyes too, where maybe it's a slow spin with an air blast, or a stationary disc with an angled circular blast. i doubt there are many purely centrifugal factory dyes out there (that don't look like ass).
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Re: anybody just paint it on/mixture...

Postby twmccoy » Sun Oct 19, 2008 9:44 am

Every dye I've ever done has been brushed on with acetone/powdered rit.

Given a couple coats it works fine. You will have to rinse and reapply a couple times to get good coverage.
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