Does a throw really have a straight line?

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Does a throw really have a straight line?

Postby luma » Tue Nov 27, 2012 4:14 am

I don't know if this has already been discussed somewhere here, but I'd really like to know if in a proper throw the disc really travels down a line as long as it's in your hand.
It's clear to me that you shouldn't hurl it around your body but pull it through and if possible not turn back further than 90° and so on...but as my wrist will release the disc it will always come out of my hand a little right of where i'm pulling...right?
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Re: Does a throw really have a straight line?

Postby JR » Tue Nov 27, 2012 5:00 am

I'm not sure about what you mean by not turn back further than 90 degrees. Do you mean reaching back not having the back face the target? Because it can be done.

What do you guys think do you miss out in acceleration if you rotate with the legs, twist the hips, turn the shoulders and chop the elbow and snap the wrist so early that the disc stays perfectly on a line? I think you probably do. Thus if the pause is longer the elbow chop will move the disc a little to the left off of the initial line. Inches so it usually doesn't matter one bit.

The disc should not rip right of the line the disc was traveling on or left. Just dead center on the line from the right pec area or a little later taking into account that the elbow chop moves the disc a little to the left. The disc should still move in a straight line for the last few inches of the throw. That is the line on which the disc should rip off of the fingers.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Does a throw really have a straight line?

Postby cubeofsoup » Tue Nov 27, 2012 7:58 am

Best I can help you is that once you get to the point where your elbow is forward and the disc is at your right pectoral, this thread covers two styles of what can happen from there: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=25241

Secondly, this video of Will Schusterick has a good low front angle and the disc is pretty much on a dead line from reach back to release: http://youtu.be/6Dz6LD9KWjo?t=43s
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Re: Does a throw really have a straight line?

Postby iacas » Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:33 am

I believe it can be, yes. Your elbow and shoulder can work together to keep the disc on a line.

I posted this graphic in another thread here and I think merits a quick look. cubeofsoup's links are good too:
http://f.cl.ly/items/3L1T2T31142R36301u ... 20Golf.gif
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Re: Does a throw really have a straight line?

Postby luma » Tue Nov 27, 2012 11:06 am

I know this belongs to Video Critique, but what you're saying is basically that this is ...well let's say "not good" as it isn't nearly a straight line :idea:



But what am I supposed to do to get it going off straighter? My first ideas would be: Turn my upper body later and Release it later...?
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Re: Does a throw really have a straight line?

Postby seabas22 » Tue Nov 27, 2012 11:40 am

Where to start...your hips are spinning out and lose your ground leverage, and you're pulling outside in(rounding) instead of pulling through inside out the body.
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Re: Does a throw really have a straight line?

Postby cubeofsoup » Tue Nov 27, 2012 12:39 pm

Compare your arm movement and elbow positions across the throw to this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHSZyYAVPbs (first throw)

Notice that he reaches straight back from the target (gets his shoulders fully perpendicular to the target) and pulls so that his elbow leads straight to the target. While the elbow is getting forward his shoulders and hips are quiet, only unloading once he starts to enter the release zone of the throw.

You reach back by moving the disc in an arc around your body (needs to be a straight back reach, not an arc), You then pull through in an arc around your body, unloading your arm, shoulders, and hips all at the same time. (too much hip movement, too early shoulder movement).
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Re: Does a throw really have a straight line?

Postby luma » Tue Nov 27, 2012 1:51 pm

Ok I think I got that over from my golf swing. how I hate to start doing new sports because you always have 100 things to do, but still you can't just let it go because you want to get better... :-) Anyway thank you very much!
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Re: Does a throw really have a straight line?

Postby JR » Fri Nov 30, 2012 5:48 am

The throw you had limits how much power you can get because the head is turned to the right of neutral and the shoulders cannot turn back as far as they could. Your disc is reached back so that your body is in between the target and the disc at the farthest point of the reach back. That leads to moving the disc on an arc instead of a straight line. Which is further harmed by the elbow not getting close enough to the target before straightening it. Look at my signature and compare that to your running direction and where the right leg lands in the final step. See this:
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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