Is a putter enough for a beginner?

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Re: Is a putter enough for a beginner?

Postby JR » Mon Oct 18, 2010 10:47 pm

Mark of course drivers, hyzers and annies need to be learned but the standard advice here is geared up for new players trying to give them a solid foundation and usable throw with some distance and accuracy as soon as possible. For that reason hooking people to the sport by making it fun as soon as possible through getting progress and ok scores a time limit is important. Because the learning curve is steep and there's always room to improve it is good that for a one month period or until getting good enough so that future improvement isn't hampered things should be kept simple. And stuff to learn as basic as possible meaning trying out so few things at a time that you can get reasonable in executing them. Once there is a solid base on which to build on knock yourself out.

In one year perspective not removing OAT is definitely gonna keep people from improving as rapidly as they could. This is why using good indicators of OAT is good. Even though it makes learning a more irritating experience at first. But that first rush of getting to a new sport is a good motivator because everyone knows that they are new and have ways to go. A 250' or 300' thrower that has played a long time have in many cases given up hope of improving and thus won't train and execute their self fulfilling prophecy. You gotta get them while they are new :-) Feldy said in his clinic that in a few months from beginning his class those that have never played will outdistance those that have played long enough to be set in their ways. It is difficult to motivate yourself to break down your form and start from scratch again. It is a good idea to get as good base as you can as soon as possible from which to improve. Time is of the essence. Thus the rudimentary keep it simple advice.

Mark is a veteran so i didn't keep this message short and simple :-)
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Is a putter enough for a beginner?

Postby mark12b » Mon Oct 18, 2010 11:18 pm

Poor form isn't necessarily harmless. For myself, at least, it wasn't until I really cleaned up my form that I made it through a summer without some kind of pain from disc golfing. I've still got stuff to work on, but I'm definitely throwing more smoothly and with less effort overall, and with less stress on the elbow in particular. Learning to throw slow plastic like putters and Comets has definitely helped smooth out my driver shots. So, I'd say that putter-only probably would be a good way to start -- but not for too long. Putter-only rounds can be kind of boring after all.
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Re: Is a putter enough for a beginner?

Postby jubuttib » Tue Oct 19, 2010 12:26 am

Of course you need to learn drivers, but this thread is more about what to start with, the first few shaking steps into the sport. And I'm very much of the opinion that putters are what you should take these steps with. That, and I've seen myself how much better and longer many newbies throw putters than anything else right when they're starting, because they don't want to fade out too early.

And correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't using just putters practically force you to learn how to manipulate the flight of the disc (hyzers and anhyzers etc.) and not the other way around?
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Re: Is a putter enough for a beginner?

Postby tgm » Tue Oct 19, 2010 1:21 pm

I'd probably also give them a slow driver too. Something that will glide farther with ease and not fade too harsh. I'm thinking like a leopard/stalker sort of disc. The problem with putter only is I think many players would get frustrated before they get the distance necessary to make the game fun and thus stop playing. I stepped down to putter/mid rounds early this season (my second year) and it's helped me a bunch with accuracy and distance I'm sure, but I don't think I would've stuck with it if I only had a putter and all my friends were throwing distance drivers 2x-3x farther. Perhaps tell them to practice with a putter more than other discs.
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Re: Is a putter enough for a beginner?

Postby jubuttib » Tue Oct 19, 2010 5:15 pm

tgm wrote:I stepped down to putter/mid rounds early this season (my second year) and it's helped me a bunch with accuracy and distance I'm sure, but I don't think I would've stuck with it if I only had a putter and all my friends were throwing distance drivers 2x-3x farther. Perhaps tell them to practice with a putter more than other discs.

This summer I visited some friends in another city. They'd been playing for little while, but were still definitely noobs. All of them used primarily either faster or slower drivers, mostly understable stuff like DX Sidewinders, Archangels etc. Until then they'd all been playing pretty equally (with one of them being a far superior forehand dominant player). I got two of them to try (for the first time probably) putter only rounds. They started to throw longer and more accurately than before, and easily improved their scores, especially compared to the ones who stuck with their drivers. They DID throw their putters longer than the others threw their drivers, and straighter. Main reason was because the discs weren't fading out during the flight anymore. Even understable drivers fade more than putters if you don't throw them hard.

I like to recommend putters for beginners because of many reasons. They're usually the straightest discs from start to finish. They can be, and will have to be, manipulated to go wherever you want. They can handle long distance throws quite alright, not as well as drivers but still, and definitely do short range stuff better than most anything. Putters WILL be the most important disc in their bag. If the only experience a player has of discs is throwing beach frisbees, then putters are definitely closer to what they're used to than any driver. You cannot force a putter, you have to work it (Pigs, Rhynos, VPs and other stuff like that can be forced obviously). This instills the key element of smoothness from the start.

And lets face it, when you're starting out, you won't throw anything that far. If your max distance is 200-250 feet, the putter isn't going to be that much shorter than the driver. I tend to believe that the main reason people have so much problems throwing their putters with any power is that they're too used to throwing their drivers with power over technique. The drivers can take it up to a point, but the putters won't listen to it. If they didn't mess with the drivers so much they wouldn't try to force the disc so much, because the putter would instantly show them what's going to happen.

They will have to learn their mids and drivers, obviously, but do they need it from the get go? Everything you need to play disc golf can be done with putters.

Okay, I'll make an amendment: If you want multiple discs to start with (there are definitely good points in having a mid in addition to a putter), whatever you get, get something that has minimal fade. Not necessarily understable, but as neutral as possible. Too often I see people try a few shots that fade out, then try to force the disc to go farther with power, which leads to OAT which does actually keep the disc from fading out instantly, but doesn't really do them any good, not really. Mako, MD2, D/X Buzzz (Z has too much LSS, it will hyzer out too soon compared to the others), Fuse, Comet, Meteor, something like that can be a very good disc for a beginner. Something that flies like a DX Leopard that has 2-3 rounds behind it and stays like that for a few months would be a good driver. Other than that I don't know any driver I could recommend a total beginner.
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Re: Is a putter enough for a beginner?

Postby JR » Wed Oct 20, 2010 4:43 am

^
Outwrote me :mrgreen:
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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