Not a driving technique question

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Not a driving technique question

Postby aDave » Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:15 pm

I'm well on my way with driving technique and thanks to the knowledge collected here, I know how to get better. Same for putting.
I don't understand how to throw a disc accurately between 50 and 150 feet.
I'll be damned if I can find any technical guides on this. Do they exist?
This is by far the worst part of my game right now and, along with putting, is the focus of the winter for me.
I'm sure that there "best practices" for this like there are for any athletic activity.
I've been watching old timers and damned if I can see anything special other than the fact that they've been tossing discs for as long as I've been alive. Most of them don't seem to be able to explain what they are doing either.
Any ideas where to begin? Any drills?
I think that this may be a blind spot in the current technical writing on the subject.
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby Leopard » Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:37 pm

i use a variable amount of "backdrag" or nose-up on my putters, and i use a variety of putters based on the shot. usually a fan grip, straight-line pull, and a good wrist snap will send it on a chest-high laser line. the nose up is to control the range as well as prevent flipping over.

my putter bag is DGR-unapproved, with a multi-mold setup as such:

- rhyno x 2 (champ and pro)
- firm ion
- firm magic
- worn omega ss

the dicier the wind, the more overstable i'll go, and the more i'll give some room for fade. the same shot can be translated to all degrees of hyzer lines, and a wide range of anhyzer lines. i'd say that approaches from 50-150 are a strong point in my game.
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby dgdave » Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:43 pm

Couldn't have said it better. I also use different putter molds- Big bead Aviar, P&A Aviar and VP
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby dgdave » Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:45 pm

I also work with a gopher (light weight lid like disc) when this shot gets out of whack.
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby zj1002 » Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:51 pm

Used a lid type disc in a field or go play catch with someone of better or equal skill. I have seen a big improvement from throwing a pro rhyno as my approach disc and playing catch with an ultimate disc. My standstill game from 200 and in has become a major strength. I pretty confident I can ring chains or metal on shots that allow me the chance to run at it. So yeah, get a lid and learn to control that
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby Leopard » Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:53 pm

^^ f'real ... lids thrive on backdrag and fan-grip finesse
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby aDave » Sun Jan 02, 2011 4:25 pm

Cool. From the the replies it seems like I may be on the right track.
I'm using a sort of fan/control grip hybrid where my pointer finger rests along the rim, thumb toward the middle and the "rip" point is the base knuckle of my middle finger(second from the palm). I get a pretty clean release with this. I've been working on a standstill annie shot lately with the goal being that the disc fades out and starts to slip backwards ( from the nose up) right at the basket. It's really beautiful when it just seems to pull itself up, put on the brakes and hover gently down into the cage.
It seems to work best with my floppy aviar PnA's. (Of course I can only hit it 1 out of 20 tries. :)....)
The pull of this shot for me starts with the disc below my waist with the nose pointing at the ground.
I bring my arm up and whip it out on the intended arc right at the end.
I seem to get better control of the power I want this way. if I try to do a "straight" pull I end up spraying wildly and have no control over release angle or power. This technique doesn't work well (yet at least) for flat or hyzer.
I'll try to work on a straight pull. I guess that like driving, you need to minimize variables and learn to make 1 technique/disc do everything.
I've heard that a whittler is good for this type of shot and am considering picking up one.
Any other recommendations?
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby keltik » Sun Jan 02, 2011 9:34 pm

a Whittler, Rattler, Polecat, Sonic, Putt'r or any other lid like disc will help you work on your "touch". I like warming up before a round with a Hero SuperHero. it's a gummy champ fastback that weighs 135g.
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby JR » Sun Jan 02, 2011 11:17 pm

I'm also in the multiple putter camp from understable to hog stable and a straight one in between. Jump putt is where it's at those distances and even beyond. The longer you throw the more benefit you get from throwing higher i haven't checked but i think on the longest jump putt attempts i get my arm up to my jaw level if i don't reach back between the feet like Nikko Locastro does. I don't do that usually because i get even more distance by reaching back with the disc behind my left side and turning the hips a bit to the left.

Multiple putters when learned are great but one should learn to throw one well on multiple lines. For beginners multiple discs are a crutch preventing one from learning all the flight manipulation skills which is baaaaaad. Once you learn to throw one preferably understable putter on all lines and all distances then you'll appreciate what a straight and overstable disc brings to the table. And they are much more easily learned for driving. And a great help in putting in the winds.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby Leopard » Mon Jan 03, 2011 12:55 am

heh.. JR with the save!

it's nice to hear. obviously i could go out with 1 putter, but dammit.. i got situational benefits with my putters.
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby aDave » Mon Jan 03, 2011 9:05 am

Here I go threadjacking myself but...
I'm not against multiple putters at all!
Right now it's a matter of educated guess work on deciding when to putt versus throw.
Anything that I can reach with a "lob" I prefer the really hard KC pro aviars for. I find that they handle the wrist spring better.
I've got a Soft Ion, Soft Wizard, 3 super light Tanks, a couple of pro rynos, and the floppy aviars as well as the KC's. I work them all with the approach shots.
You can cut a sheet of 4x8 in half with a hand held ripsaw but you can do it quicker with a circular saw.
Just like drivers, discs of differing stability are useful for different lines.
When I was referring to the one disc thing above, it was more for doing driver style field work for the straight pull on short distances with a putter.
I don't have a hell of a lot of experience but it just makes no sense to handicap yourself if you know a lot of discs really well.
When I actually play a round though I do keep the # of molds/discs down to a min.
If I know the course well I can really cut the bag back.
I don't like carrying a huge bag.
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby CatPredator » Mon Jan 03, 2011 10:02 am

You don't see technical guides because the concepts that apply to driving are relevant on all non-putt throws. I make all of my throws with the same basic form.

Learning to get the disc to the power zone (which happens naturally on a "straight pull"), getting your release point out in front of you, and developing big snap and a feel for the hit are all important concepts for approach shots and throw ins as well as getting big D. Once you learn this stuff you can power it down for incredible accuracy.

On anything other than a putt I still try to "hit it" but I put in less and less power as I get closer until it's almost exclusively wrist action. Learning to throw like this allows you to impart enough spin on the disc that it holds it's line at low speeds and doesn't fly past the basket or fade out early.

The reason people spray is because their arm motion, timing, wrist extension, release point, and balance are different every shot. Developing good driving form and power eliminates all of these things. After that just make sure you have some obstacles to throw around so your not just throwing 15 putters into a wide open field. Find a line and try to hit it with all your putters.
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby Aaron_D » Tue Jan 04, 2011 1:41 pm

it just makes no sense to handicap yourself if you know a lot of discs really well.


The thing is...you probably dont.
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby aDave » Tue Jan 04, 2011 2:00 pm

Oh certainly not! I guess that's why I included the line
aDave wrote:When I actually play a round though I do keep the # of molds/discs down to a min.

This was to indicate that at I DO practice "mold minimalism" when I am keeping score as opposed to when I'm doing field work and trying to learn all of my discs really well.
I probably should have been a little clearer. :roll:
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Re: Not a driving technique question

Postby Joe Reynolds » Wed Jan 05, 2011 2:50 pm

It's not the mold, it's your technique. Right pec drill is what you need. Chip shots are about minimizing you movements and throwing with all snap. Just pound the hammer. One mold for putting and up shots in all conditions will make you ALOT better in the long run.
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