Teaching yourself bad habits from playing in the snow?

Information, Questions, Discussion about Throwing Mechanics and Technique

Moderators: Timko, Solty, Frank Delicious, Blake_T, Fritz, Booter

Teaching yourself bad habits from playing in the snow?

Postby Sean40474 » Sun Mar 13, 2011 1:59 pm

I was curious to know what anybody's theory is on this matter. We only get to play from the beginning of May to the end of October w/o any snow. During the winter all of our tee pads are covered in snow and ice, so you have worry about busting your ass when you want to put some mustard on your throw.

Do any of you feel like you're teaching yourself bad habits and taking step(s) backward because you're consistently not executing good form? I feel like the first part of spring/summer is working out the BS in my form that I ingrained during the winter. Do any of you feel like it almost comes back immediately once you have sound footing again? I'm sure some of you believe there are strides being made during the winter months, but I feel like that isn't true sometimes. I can see the short game improving and maybe putting, but that is about it.

I feel like I'll never reach my full potential or it will take longer to get where I could be just because I live in Alaska. Anybody else feel limited in their golf game just because of where you live?
It's all about discipline and focused practice!

masterbeato wrote:...900 feet, everybody is happy.
Sean40474
Colonel Cleavage
User avatar
 
Posts: 874
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 12:06 pm
Location: North Alabama
Favorite Disc: PDGazelle/Comet/Pure

Re: Teaching yourself bad habits from playing in the snow?

Postby colombo117 » Sun Mar 13, 2011 2:53 pm

I hear what your saying.

I just went out this morning and had my first field session, not much D was being thrown. I just went out with rocs and eagles and threw them nice and smooth. Last fall I could throw my teebirds 350 on low golf lines and further with high annie D lines, but right now I am only throwing 280-320 on low line shots with fairway drivers.

If I go out and work on my footing and keeping my pull through smooth, I feel like it helps to get that form back on track sooner than later.

Starting slow (throwing smooth and using slower discs) has always helped me get back sooner.
Ion Challenger Roc EL/EX QJLS Valkyrie Predator
colombo117
Fairway Surgeon
User avatar
 
Posts: 821
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 10:30 am
Location: A real cool club on the other side of town.
Favorite Disc: Challenger

Re: Teaching yourself bad habits from playing in the snow?

Postby jubuttib » Sun Mar 13, 2011 3:27 pm

Today was the first day I felt I could really grip the disc again after a long long while struggling with the cold. My friend who has magical fingers that never freeze up or lose grip has been throwing pretty nicely the whole winter, but I've been struggling hitting 300' at times due to not being able to hang on to the disc. Today it was only around 30 degrees Fahrenheit and from the start I was ripping the disc almost on par with my summer performance. So no, I don't think it hurts me, but it really depends on how much you alter your form during the winter months.
Parks wrote:If the posts on this forum are any indication, the PD is like a Teebird with sunshine coming out of its butthole so hard that it flies faster.
Anode|ION|JOKERi|MD2|FD|TD|PD|LEGENDa
jubuttib
Long Finnish Word
User avatar
 
Posts: 5447
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2010 4:30 pm
Location: Finland
Favorite Disc: Orange FR P-Line MD2

Re: Teaching yourself bad habits from playing in the snow?

Postby rusch_bag » Sun Mar 13, 2011 4:50 pm

I said to my friends while I was playing today that I feel like I am still trying to run up like I am on ice. That means slow and I am throwing soft too. I keep coming up short on most holes. Got to get out of that habit real quick as I have a tournament this weekend.
rusch_bag
Plastic Fondler
User avatar
 
Posts: 2397
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2007 2:50 pm
Location: Land of the Cheese
Favorite Disc: ROC

Re: Teaching yourself bad habits from playing in the snow?

Postby JR » Sun Mar 13, 2011 4:59 pm

I've always been leg dominant in D so you can imagine how differently i need to throw and select discs in the winter. I think i mostly gain in salvaging something out of slipped steps :lol:
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
JR
Scandinavian Video Mafia
User avatar
 
Posts: 11439
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2007 6:07 am
Location: Finland, sea level
Favorite Disc: About to ace

Re: Teaching yourself bad habits from playing in the snow?

Postby Mark Ellis » Sun Mar 13, 2011 5:16 pm

Playing in bad conditions helps your game, mostly notably in developing balance and specialty shots.

In summer you might deal with poor footing due to mud or heavy rain. In summer you will also throw on uphill, downhill and sidehill lies. There are times you throw with one foot in a hole, on top of a log or laying on your side pitching out. All the experience you get in the bad conditions of winter translates to the next odd challenge you face in any weather.

I played in leagues today in Michigan. The freeze/thaw/refreeze cycle was such that most fairways were a thick sheet of ice, interspersed with patches of snow and mud (all the spots which were exposed to sunlight in the past couple days were pure ice, the spots in shade were snow or mud). Just walking in these conditions was tricky, especially on the hills. I had putts and upshots where it was difficult to take and maintain a legal stance.

On some steep sidehills the best option is sometimes a forehand, whether the shot is a putt or an upshot. That skill, which is critical in the winter, is also valuable in picture perfect weather in June.

In summer the dirt is a pretty predictable surface, allowing you to nestle an upshot close to the basket. When the basket is surrounded by ice, that same upshot requires a much finer and softer touch. In the summer a 30 foot putt is not scary unless it is on the side of a cliff or next to OB. But on a sheet of ice, an airball putt from 30 feet may slide 50 feet past. So the practice under pressure from the increased risks of winter can provide long term benefit.

The best players in Michigan play all winter, as do the players working on getting into that group.
Mark Ellis
The Big Fundamental
User avatar
 
Posts: 933
Joined: Fri Jan 15, 2010 7:32 pm
Location: Brighton, Michigan
Favorite Disc: Rattler

Re: Teaching yourself bad habits from playing in the snow?

Postby Sean40474 » Sun Mar 13, 2011 11:45 pm

Mark Ellis wrote:Playing in bad conditions helps your game, mostly notably in developing balance and specialty shots.

In summer you might deal with poor footing due to mud or heavy rain. In summer you will also throw on uphill, downhill and sidehill lies. There are times you throw with one foot in a hole, on top of a log or laying on your side pitching out. All the experience you get in the bad conditions of winter translates to the next odd challenge you face in any weather.

I played in leagues today in Michigan. The freeze/thaw/refreeze cycle was such that most fairways were a thick sheet of ice, interspersed with patches of snow and mud (all the spots which were exposed to sunlight in the past couple days were pure ice, the spots in shade were snow or mud). Just walking in these conditions was tricky, especially on the hills. I had putts and upshots where it was difficult to take and maintain a legal stance.

On some steep sidehills the best option is sometimes a forehand, whether the shot is a putt or an upshot. That skill, which is critical in the winter, is also valuable in picture perfect weather in June.

In summer the dirt is a pretty predictable surface, allowing you to nestle an upshot close to the basket. When the basket is surrounded by ice, that same upshot requires a much finer and softer touch. In the summer a 30 foot putt is not scary unless it is on the side of a cliff or next to OB. But on a sheet of ice, an airball putt from 30 feet may slide 50 feet past. So the practice under pressure from the increased risks of winter can provide long term benefit.

The best players in Michigan play all winter, as do the players working on getting into that group.


LOL, that seems to be the same trend here with the open guys. A lot of the others that don't play during the winter always seem to fall further behind. They always say something about how their behind or rusty. I'm sure that is part of it, but the other part is the we've passed them. I've noticed that I've gotten better and those that play in the winter have gotten better as well.

I still believe sometimes that I'd be further along. A big part of that is I'd be playing with A LOT more better players or at least have the chance. We have some good players, but nobody is "great" or even scratch. I want to get better by playing with better folks and throw longer by throwing with people that throw long. I think there is only one person that I know of in the state that can consistently throw over 450'.
It's all about discipline and focused practice!

masterbeato wrote:...900 feet, everybody is happy.
Sean40474
Colonel Cleavage
User avatar
 
Posts: 874
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 12:06 pm
Location: North Alabama
Favorite Disc: PDGazelle/Comet/Pure

Re: Teaching yourself bad habits from playing in the snow?

Postby Chuck Kennedy » Mon Mar 14, 2011 7:35 am

Perhaps you can look at the other way around that playing in summer teaches yourself 'bad habits' for playing in snow since your seasons are both six months long? It might be helpful to look at it as two related but separate games where some habits work for both but other habits are unique to each game, sort of how putting on a miniature golf course is a lot like ball golf putting but you don't get the benefit of bank shots on ball golf greens.
Chuck Kennedy
1000 Rated Poster
 
Posts: 1652
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 10:42 pm
Location: Twin Cities

Re: Teaching yourself bad habits from playing in the snow?

Postby CatPredator » Mon Mar 14, 2011 7:51 am

I live in Minnesota, which may not be quite as far north as Alaska, but we did get 80+ inches of snow this winter. We bring a shovel. My buddy and I keep tee pads at two courses in our area groomed ourselves...

This was my first winter playing disc golf in the snow and it's been great. Far from regressing with my game, winter has helped me focus on snap. I was throwing standstills from December to February until it got warm enough for me to just go out in shoes (~20F). Adding footwork back in is easy. My confidence has gone up and my putting is sharp going into spring...
CatPredator
Tree Magnet
 
Posts: 365
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 3:54 pm
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Favorite Disc: Aviars


Return to Technique

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests