Short approaches

Information, Questions, Discussion about Throwing Mechanics and Technique

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Postby Midnightbiker » Sun Apr 06, 2008 11:35 pm

Well, all I am trying to say is that I have learned how to ajust my power level for different shots useing my Coyote as an approach disc. It works great for me. To each his own I guess.
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Postby IowaDiscGolf » Sun Apr 06, 2008 11:38 pm

Midnightbiker wrote:Well, all I am trying to say is that I have learned how to ajust my power level for different shots useing my Coyote as an approach disc. It works great for me. To each his own I guess.


Amen to that, to each his own. I simply meant that a Coyote that cannot be thrown over 200' without flipping indicates either (A.) that you live and play disc golf near the Columbia River Gorge with 30+ mph winds, or (B.) there's some torque problems. To your point, however, it's not a "problem" per se unless you deem it so. I only pointed it out because I had precisely that problem myself.

If you putt best using an upside down Whippet, so be it. Whatever gets the job done! :)
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Postby Blake_T » Sun Apr 06, 2008 11:40 pm

a magic disc isn't a solution to a technique problem though.

often magic discs reinforce and increase technique problems.
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Postby black udder » Mon Apr 07, 2008 8:39 am

Adding to the standing still thing... what I did was to stand more like this:

Right Foot
Left Foot

by doing that, it forced me to lean/push towards my pivot foot. That kept me over the disc and helped my timing.

Dunno if that would be a good thing or not (Blake could say I'm sure). I do believe that it's all about timing and repetition. Once you have it, you'll find it useful all over the course.
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Postby Eric O » Mon Apr 07, 2008 9:25 am

Blake_T wrote:
learning to throw an upshot from a stand still is key to improving your game.


i even believe learning to throw a drive from a standstill is key :)
I use a runup only when necessary. Granted that off the teepad that is a given on all but really short holes. Stationary shots are easier for me to control, for distance, height, accuracy you name it.

I don't know anyone who uses a runup for upshots.
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Postby IowaDiscGolf » Mon Apr 07, 2008 9:31 am

Eric O wrote:
Blake_T wrote:
learning to throw an upshot from a stand still is key to improving your game.


i even believe learning to throw a drive from a standstill is key :)
I use a runup only when necessary. Granted that off the teepad that is a given on all but really short holes. Stationary shots are easier for me to control, for distance, height, accuracy you name it.

I don't know anyone who uses a runup for upshots.


When I see people trying to establish a run-up for approaches under 200' or so, it makes me a little nervous. I consider it far more of a luxury than a necessity, and realistically it only adds "work" to the throw.
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Postby CJ1998 » Mon Apr 07, 2008 6:07 pm

I've had a chance to work on some of the suggestions this afternoon. I think that a run-up before any shot helps timing and rhythm if you're used to it. I definitely can see the value in being able to throw fairly far from a standstill.

The main thing I did was try to press out and down with my thumb as I throw, especially at the rip. I also delayed my pull just a bit. From the tee, I just took a more relaxed approach then a regular drive. I Seemed to have better control over where the disc was going in all scenarios.

Now the wind. . . that's another story. Just because it's blowing one way where you're standing does not mean that it's blowing the same direction at the basket. Drives were not happening, approaches were sailing and putts were scary. I do try to practice in the wind when I can, but it's been quite windy for a while here. It'd be nice to have some calm days so that my stress level goes down!
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Postby Blake_T » Mon Apr 07, 2008 8:32 pm

eric o has the right idea.


I think that a run-up before any shot helps timing and rhythm if you're used to it.


people use it to get forward momentum... they think it's rhythm, but in actuality it's that they are getting forward momentum. if your stationary throw gives you forward momentum (push off left foot, step through with left foot during follow through), it's much more accurate. forward momentum = weight shift.
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Postby tumpsi » Tue Apr 08, 2008 12:50 am

HAY GUISE!

I tested the Discmania P2 yesterday. Don't know what happened, but
my approaches & putts just rocked with it, and hopefully they stay that way!

I believe the P2 is an Aviar P&A bottomed KC/JK Aviar, or at least it's looks
like one. The S-line (Star) is the same blend that Aviar Driver has, and it's
just bad, slippery and too stiff for a putter. The D-line is some sort of soft blend
of DX, with a nice grip, hopefully it doesn't beat in too quickly.
I'll continue to use the P2's instead of Glow Aviars at least for a while and see
how they work.
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Postby millsbury » Sat Apr 12, 2008 3:42 pm

[quote=tumpsi] I tried the Classic Aviar today, and it sucked big time. The mold is something I've been looking for, but the plastic is just too stiff.
[/quote]

Blasphemer! I love the hard grids, especially for anheyser approaches, or any kind of approach under 200' and of they are my putter of choice as well.
Last edited by millsbury on Sat Apr 12, 2008 3:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby IowaDiscGolf » Sat Apr 12, 2008 3:46 pm

millsbury wrote:
tumpsi wrote:I tried the Classic Aviar today, and it sucked big time. The mold is something
I've been looking for, but the plastic is just too stiff. I changed my approach
stance to more drive-like, and it gave some good results too. Just need to
work it out much, much more.


Blasphemer! I love the hard grids, especially for anheyser approaches, or any kind of approach under 200' and of they are my putter of choice as well.


We talking about the grid stamp old big bead Aviars, in "clicky" plastic?

These things are really neat...difficult to not torque, which makes them a great disc to cultivate spin control on approaches.
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Postby millsbury » Sat Apr 12, 2008 3:54 pm

[quote="IowaDiscGolf"][quote="millsbury"][quote="tumpsi"]I tried the Classic Aviar today, and it sucked big time. The mold is something
I've been looking for, but the plastic is just too stiff. I changed my approach
stance to more drive-like, and it gave some good results too. Just need to
work it out much, much more.
[/quote]

Blasphemer! I love the hard grids, especially for anheyser approaches, or any kind of approach under 200' and of they are my putter of choice as well.[/quote]

We talking about the grid stamp old big bead Aviars, in "clicky" plastic?

These things are really neat...difficult to not torque, which makes them a great disc to cultivate spin control on approaches.[/quote]

Not sure--I use the Aviar Classics that are still currently made, grid stamp and super stiff plastic, I believe they have the 'micro bead' unlike the current P+A which has no bead at all. Yeah if you throw them with a nice spin and don't try to overpower them they are plenty stable and just glide nice and straight wherever you throw them.
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Postby tumpsi » Sat Apr 12, 2008 11:26 pm

millsbury wrote:Not sure--I use the Aviar Classics that are still currently made, grid stamp and super stiff plastic, I believe they have the 'micro bead' unlike the current P+A which has no bead at all. Yeah if you throw them with a nice spin and don't try to overpower them they are plenty stable and just glide nice and straight wherever you throw them.

Yeah, the same ones. Grid stamped small bead Aviar molded in
very, very stiff plastic. I love the mold, but hate the plastic.
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Postby CJ1998 » Sun Apr 13, 2008 11:25 am

Blake_T wrote:eric o has the right idea.


I think that a run-up before any shot helps timing and rhythm if you're used to it.


people use it to get forward momentum... they think it's rhythm, but in actuality it's that they are getting forward momentum. if your stationary throw gives you forward momentum (push off left foot, step through with left foot during follow through), it's much more accurate. forward momentum = weight shift.


Thanks for the clarity. I've been trying not to use a runup on anything less than 200 feet. The strange thing is, upshots went much better than drives. I think it's because upshots were mainly without obstacles.

In the round I played yesterday, I made sure my weight was getting transferred on standstill shots and it seemed to help. I still have some timing issues to work out, but I think that will come with time.
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Postby millsbury » Mon Apr 14, 2008 7:58 am

[quote="tumpsi"][quote="millsbury"]
Not sure--I use the Aviar Classics that are still currently made, grid stamp and super stiff plastic, I believe they have the 'micro bead' unlike the current P+A which has no bead at all. Yeah if you throw them with a nice spin and don't try to overpower them they are plenty stable and just glide nice and straight wherever you throw them.[/quote]
Yeah, the same ones. Grid stamped small bead Aviar molded in
very, very stiff plastic. I love the mold, but hate the plastic.[/quote]

Funny I don't think the mold is too big a difference, I like those for the stiff plastic!

About your original question--playing catch seems like good advice. You need to work on getting spin on your disc without too much actual power--ever throw Ultimate frisbees? Anyway the 100-200 foot putter approach should in my opinion be the basic building block of ALL golf shots, so practice!
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