...speed of your body in the drive?

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...speed of your body in the drive?

Postby Frontman311 » Tue Jun 27, 2006 8:49 pm

Of course, let me know if there is a thread covering this and/or an article outlining the fine details of this question.

So when I watch pros throw (on video), some have quick skip-like x-steps and some have slightly longer emphasized strides, and some move really slowly it seems (i.e. Hyzernauts video). Is there a better way?

I understand that's it's about maximum acceleration into the rip (right?), so what seems like a good formula to allow yourself that much acceleration? Will it just vary from person to person?

Daymon Pugh for example takes a gazillion steps in his big throws (when he has the room), but some just non-chalantly walk up and throw the same distance...I can throw a Buzz 300' a couple different ways:

Way 1: Doing kind a normal drive at an "average" speed which is rushing anything but moving quickly through the x-step...

Way 2: Strictly walking through the x-step and from the end of my reach back just putting all energy through the rip, 'causing it to go the same distance...

Mind you, I swear I can't do the same thing with drivers and have the same results...


Is this all in my head? Does it matter how fast I move pre-movement from reach back? Does any of this make sense at all???
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Postby Blake_T » Tue Jun 27, 2006 9:07 pm

the two most important parts of the x-step are to:
1) use your hips
2) get your weight forward.

how much run up people need depends a lot on physical abilities.

the more athletic you are, the less motion you need to get up to speed. e.g. mark madsen on the timberwolves is one of the fastest guys from endline to endline... but it takes him 4-5 steps to reach speed. allen iverson on the otherhand probably isn't as fast in raw speed, but can accelerate to 100% within 1-1.5 steps.

that being said, timing becomes the #1 factor in "hitting" a throw.

while there lies more potential at greater speeds, the window for "good" timing becomes increasingly small. it is possible to throw over 430' using simply finish power, but to go 700' you will need whip + finish power. however, it is not possible to go 430' simply on whip power.

if you watch enough DG dvd's you'll find that all big throwing pros have a great amount of finish power, regardless of the amount of whip they have. for example, markus kallstrom has an insane amount of finish power, but he doesn't have nearly the amount of whip that shawn sinclair has. one thing they do have in common is a very strong finish.

to sum it up, you NEED a strong finish. the faster you can go WITH a strong finish, the better, but as you go faster, a well-timed finish will become increasingly difficult to feel.
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Postby Frontman311 » Tue Jun 27, 2006 9:17 pm

That makes a whole lot of sense, thanks. Tomorrow: applied sciences!
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Postby presidio hills » Wed Jun 28, 2006 1:25 am

this is something i've been contemplating, too.
i've been thinking that when getting more momentum into a runup it is important to be quicker with the arm. with a slower runup the arm should be slower, but it's easier to time and you can still be strong. is that right?

thanks for asking the question and good response blake. i like the clips of markus kallstrom this site has... i've always noticed his throw just looked damn strong. it does seem like he leans back, however... does his upper body follow through strong enough for that to not matter?
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Postby Blake_T » Wed Jun 28, 2006 1:40 am

i tend to think of it this way:

if you were trying to break down a door with your shoulder and had as much room as you wanted to run up, there are a couple of scenarios:
1) taking 3 steps
2) taking 20 steps

basically, with #1 you are more apt to get more focused power since every motion is defined and conscious. with #2, there is more power potential but it is much more difficult to focus that power.

as for markus, if he was throwing a different trajectory his weight would be more forward (at the hit his chest is approximately over his knee, but he is leaned back). part of it is that he throws quite high... those throws had an apex in the 35-50' range and went over 475'.
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Postby cschwab » Wed Jun 28, 2006 10:00 am

I just wanted to say I laughed because I think this is the first time I've ever seen Allen Iverson used as an example on a disc golf technique forum. :D

Make sure you practice more than he does.
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