Returning to game with bad back and torn ACL

While mechanics are crucial to the disc golf throw, it's important to have your body in shape to throw. Talk about conditioning and injuries here.

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Returning to game with bad back and torn ACL

Postby jomby15 » Sun Jun 19, 2011 4:00 pm

I haven't played in 12 years, and since then I've had some pretty bad injuries. Destroyed my left ACL and haven't gotten it repaired. I've also had some severe lower back problems (herniated discs) that required cortisone and rehab. But at this point, at age 35, I'm pretty much cautiously functional.

Recently, though, I went to a party where someone had a basket and a couple discs in the backyard, and I just tossed a few, and my heart leapt! I forgot how much I love the game! So I'm looking to come back to it, but I want to do it safely. Any advice on how I should modify/play the game given my medical history? I used to be all about backhand power with the viper as my go-to driver. From what I understand, the game has changed, at least driver-wise, it seems.

I'd like to have fun, be competitive and be safe.
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Re: Returning to game with bad back and torn ACL

Postby Peot » Sun Jun 19, 2011 9:43 pm

Get your ACL fixed, man. I tore my ACL/MCL/cartilage and cracked my femur wrestling in 2006 and in 5 years the surgery is already a much more streamlined process. Medical technology is pretty unbelievable these days. I know it's expensive and health insurance is an issue for a lot of people, but I would do everything within my power to get that done.
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Re: Returning to game with bad back and torn ACL

Postby JR » Mon Jun 20, 2011 11:38 am

You should definitely start by trying top learn to finesse the throws and gain accuracy. It's great for scores but it is vital for not losing another 12 years or the quality of your life and never being able to play again. I'd play only short periods in the beginning and giving your body ample time to recover between sessions. And only slowly gradually increasing session length and practice times per week. I recommend against distance drilling until you know how your body takes it. The trouble with herniated discs is that you may only know that you overdid it on the next day when the swelling occurs.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Returning to game with bad back and torn ACL

Postby jomby15 » Mon Jun 20, 2011 4:49 pm

@Peot-- Unfortunately, I'm not in a place where I can get my ACL repaired right now. Luckily, though it's my left knee and I throw right handed.

@JR-- Sounds good. I think going as slow as possible is best bet. I'm wondering if developing a forehand throw will be better in the long run. Should I also get lower weight discs too?
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Re: Returning to game with bad back and torn ACL

Postby JR » Tue Jun 21, 2011 12:35 am

Lighter discs will definitely help and some discs are good even at 150 grams. It depends on your power but Discmania S-Line PD and Innova Star or Champion Teebird are fine at 150 for example for a powerful throw. Others need less on them even with good form and a 150 Champion Valkyrie has a low power requirement for the distance.

I think sidearm throws are more taxing on the body as a whole but especially to the left leg so i wouldn't go that way because all the momentum you've created goes to move or strain the left leg. Even if you had a perfect follow through you still need to use a lot of muscle power to just stay in the correct stance.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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