Competition

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Postby eg37167 » Thu Oct 26, 2006 9:48 am

Your experience (bad tourney) is exactly why I have avoided the local tourneys and club. There is a feeling of 'if you aren't PDGA, you aren't crap' I get from the locals here. They setup the course as extremely challenging on public park land with no beginner alternative. And they 'close' the course for the weekend for a members only tournament every so often which just rubs me the wrong way.

I have started to drive to courses farther from home to avoid them. I do want to improve but play maybe once a week so I rarely throw par. I enjoy getting outdoors and all the walking. I don't need the competition aspect or the stuffed shirt feeling they project.
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Postby bigs348 » Thu Oct 26, 2006 10:30 am

eg37167 wrote:Your experience (bad tourney) is exactly why I have avoided the local tourneys and club. There is a feeling of 'if you aren't PDGA, you aren't crap' I get from the locals here. They setup the course as extremely challenging on public park land with no beginner alternative. And they 'close' the course for the weekend for a members only tournament every so often which just rubs me the wrong way.


As a strong member of my local club, sometimes these kind of steps are necessary.

My home course has 3 pin positions. When we have our big SuperTour event every September, we move everything into the long positions for 2-3 weeks before the event. This gives player's competing a chance to practice the course, when it's normally not nearly as long or challenging. The majority of the time, we have the course set up for intermediate to advanced players with a mix of the pin placements.

As for closing the course, during the tournament we have people on every hole. We'd rather not close the course, but we have no choice if we want the tourney to run smoothly. Of course, it's only maybe 3 days a year (1 1-day event, and 1 2-day event) that we actually close the course. It's not members only either (although for our 2-day event, you do have to be a PDGA member to compete).

I know it sucks to be a casual player and not be able to play a course because of events going on, but sometimes there's no alternative.
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Postby bigs348 » Thu Oct 26, 2006 10:43 am

As far as competition goes, I love playing in tournaments. I spent a few years playing in our local club's league, playing mostly casual rounds by myself or with a few friends, and playing maybe one local sanctioned tourney a year.

I've gotten to the point, where I almost only like golf when there's competition. If I go out and play a casual round, I have no incentive, and I usually play like crap and this somewhat impedes on my fun level. In a tournament, I'm trying to do my best, to compete against others and myself, to improve my rating, and to have a good time, and that's where my best golf comes out.

I love traveling to tournies, meeting new people, seeing old friends I haven't seen since the last tournament, player's party are always awesome, and I love playing golf against a different course, different field of players, whatever. This weekend I'll be playing my 20th and last PDGA event of the year. While I still have a half a dozen doubles tournaments coming up this fall, and a winter league to play in, I'm going to miss the travel and the competition that I've been so heavily involved in this year.

For the majority of the year, I'll putt almost every day, hit the field for practice 2 or 3 times a week, and then play a tournament on the weekend, sanctioned or not. My game has improved dramatically this year and competition keeps me sharp.
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Postby swel304 » Thu Oct 26, 2006 11:05 am

I heard about an issue once at our local course where one of the event planners tried to tell a guy (which happend to be one the guys who helped put in half the baskets) he couldnt play that day because there was a tournament going on. A guy from the park board told us that as it is a public park, they have no right to tell anyone they cannot play. that said, I cant see why a casual player would want to be on the course during a tourney. Aside from holding up the other players, it would take forever to play a round. Another thing most casual players tend to forget is that most of the people in the club/tourny rounds are the same people who cut grass, build benches, lay tee pads, and everything else that goes into that course others enjoy for free. at best the city cuts the grass (that can be cut with a tractor, not weedeating) and empties garbage cans, its the club memebers that are doing the real upkeep of the course. people in the local club are also constantly putting money into the course by way of yearly dues and club fees from the weekly doubles and whatnot. advance pin setups will definitly improve your game. I never really understood why people who dont keep score are so concerened with long placements, though it can be frustrating at times. even the "pros" at our local course complain about long placements. It does suck to not be able to play a day you want, and Im not trying to be rude, just to point out that without the clubs and tourneys there would be no course, or at the very least it wouldnt be playable.
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Postby deaddisc » Thu Oct 26, 2006 11:39 am

eg37167

I see you are from Smyrna, home to one of the finest courses I have ever played. You are lucky to have such a sweet course as you home course.

On to the topic at hand; I really enjoy playing in tournaments, even though it always seems to be raining or snowing when i do. The competition helps to keep me grounded when i can see some of the skills that the other players have. Also, tourneys remind me just how crucial putting really is to the game. It seems to me that if I play well in a tourney it isnt because of good drives/upshots, but really that i putted on a high level.
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Postby eg37167 » Thu Oct 26, 2006 11:41 am

Some good points, there, no doubt true for many courses in public parks. In this case, my understanding is the city mows the grass every few weeks, benchs and trash cans are std with rest of park, and tee pads and baskets were bought and erected by the park. In other words, the city (me as a taxpayer) bear all the expenses and upkeep. All I can see the club involved with is scheduling an occasional clean up day. I came by to do my part once on the appointed day near the end of the time but everyone was already gone.

You know, I might not have even been peeved at the tournament if they had posted signs the week before so I didn't make the trip over to find it closed. I guess what galls me is they treat it like a private club and taxpayers foot the bill but get second rate status. I avoid going there now and drive to the next county to Seven Oaks, where the regulars are nicer, invite people to participate, posts notices all over the course of upcoming events, etc.

Seven Oaks in Nashville is my favorite around here, BTW...
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Postby domromer » Thu Oct 26, 2006 11:44 am

I now what you mean by the elitist atitiude. I've played with the local club a few times, it seems unless you have a bag full of 80 discs and spend all the time being pissed off about your shot, then you just don't fit in. It just seems to be taken so seriously here. It's like they take all the fun out of it.
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Postby Blake_T » Thu Oct 26, 2006 11:53 am

most of the tournament atmospheres depend upon the players involved.

if your local competitive scene has a lot of tools, or is laden with politics, chances are your tournaments will be less fun. having a large number of tournament players will increase the chances you will be with friendly players, but also increase the potential #'s of tools, even if they are few.

the thing w/ dg, is that if you play say, 3 league nights a month and 1 tournament a month, you will end up with a lot of DG friends to play rounds with casually.

another thing to keep in mind is that only a small percentage of disc golfers have a large athletic background (although this % increases every year). people who have not faced high pressure athletic competition/situations generally have a weaker mental game in their ability to shrug off an errant shot, remain cool/focused, etc.

basically, if people are overly serious, it's generally because they do not have the ability to switch on/off their "game face" between shots. i played a lot of intermediate tourneys and generally have found ways to teach people rules, etiquette, help them stay calm, etc.

why most people get pissy during tourneys:
their view of competition if they score better than other players they will win.

my view of GOLF: if you play the course well, you will finish well.

when people stop playing golf and start playing for place, a lot of them lose their better characteristics and the ugliest sides of them surface.

btw, i have played with tools and with great people. it's all random and based upon what types of people are there. not all of them are any one way.

as for elitism, what i can say is that clubs that have an exclusive attitude rather than inclusive sink their own ship in terms of DG growth and involvement.
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Postby eg37167 » Thu Oct 26, 2006 11:59 am

"I see you are from Smyrna, home to one of the finest courses I have ever played. You are lucky to have such a sweet course as you home course"
Sharp Springs is the very course I am talking about.
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Postby domromer » Thu Oct 26, 2006 12:11 pm

Good points Blake,
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Postby chris86wm » Thu Oct 26, 2006 12:15 pm

sharp springs is a rediculously hard course. its not friendly to new comers at all and the mosquitos suck. although the course was tough, I must say the guys I met up there while playing were pretty nice. When I first started playing, a bunch of guys at the course invited me to play a round with them. Of course I didnt play half as good as they did, but they were very nice and gave me some tips.
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Postby swel304 » Thu Oct 26, 2006 12:22 pm

At our course/park at least, most of the work was done by tthe locals. Of course most of the park upkeep is paid for with tax money but for the actual course all the holes have a local sponser that paid for the basket, ect.. any weedeating, tee cleaning, drainage issues, and keeping wooded holes playable, cutting/trimming dead trees in danger of falling, is all handled by the club members. they assign specific holes to members who volunteer to care for a hole. Sounds like you do have some legit problems with how things are being run, maybe you could attend some of the meetings and get something happeing. If you feel you are being treated unfairly as a taxpayer you should definitly do something about it.
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Postby some call me...tim? » Thu Oct 26, 2006 12:24 pm

I know the elitist type you're talking about. My original home course had a bunch of them, it wasn't an organized club or anything, just the big roving pack of "locals." For the longest time, I did all I could to avoid having to play anywhere near them...if I saw them on hole 3, I'd skip ahead to hole 6 or something. They just seemed to have the attitude that they owned the course, and had to tolerate everyone else there. The bright side of that is that probably 90% of the rest of the players on the course feel exactly the same way you do, and before you know it, you find yourself in your own little clique. As it turned out, I eventually found myself throwing with the pack of locals, and most of them turned out to be pretty nice guys. There were one or two that had that elitist attitude, but the most of the locals disliked that attitude as much as we do.

Now at my new home course, I've inadvertently found myself in the "locals pack", and I try to be as friendly as I can to newbies or strangers that I see on the course. DG is just too cool a sport for people to be dicks about it.
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Postby Thatdirtykid » Thu Oct 26, 2006 12:39 pm

In my area I know the local clubs play a big role in maintaining parks, and I believe helped install some of them.

although we did have to wait a couple months for the city to put baskets in, when teepads, sleeves and signs were already all done :roll: it kinda sucked, but now its there it was very worth the wait.
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Postby deaddisc » Thu Oct 26, 2006 12:51 pm

eg37167 wrote:Seven Oaks in Nashville is my favorite around here, BTW...


That was a good course too; you really are lucky to have all those courses around your area. My advise would be that if you cant seem to crack the local's attitude on one course to play another one more frequently. You have a lot of courses around you so take advantage of that. Also, it is surprising that they didnt post anything in advance about closing the course for a tourney. Usually up here in new england there are signs at the kiosks/tables saying that the course will be closed on X day for Y reason. Id say that should be the first step for your locals to be more inclusive. While I admit that they probably put a lot of work into the course and deserve to be able to reap the fruits, they should still be mindfull of others on the course and try to be as inclusive as possible.
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