distance in winter

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distance in winter

Postby short drive » Sun Feb 04, 2007 11:21 am

do disc go slower in winter and if so how much distance do you lose?
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Postby Weebl » Sun Feb 04, 2007 12:11 pm

I have not noticed a different between 80 degrees F and 30 degrees F. More than anything it's my body being stiff in the cold either due to temperature or the layers I'm wearing to stay warm.
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Postby black udder » Sun Feb 04, 2007 2:07 pm

I'll say you lose distance. I want to say folks have quoted 10-20%... I'd say at least 10%. Without the warm air to lift the disc, the disc doesn't get as much lift or glide.

For the most part, I don't think it's significant, however, if you're just barely making a hole - say you throw just 300' and there's a hole right at 300', then in the summer you might park it, but in the winter come up a little short.

Blake can probably explain all the physics on why it does/doesn't happen, but from my experience, you do lose some distance.
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Postby Terrence » Sun Feb 04, 2007 3:15 pm

When it was just cold out without a foot of snow on the ground, I didn't have any noticable drop in the little distance I have. I would just throw 20-30 drives and walk around for a good 15 minutes before actually playing. Once I was warmed up a little and loose, throwing was the same. Now there's snow on the ground, in the air, and it's -18F.
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Postby Bradley Walker » Sun Feb 04, 2007 6:42 pm

black udder wrote:Blake can probably explain all the physics on why it does/doesn't happen, but from my experience, you do lose some distance.


Colder air is substantially thicker than hot air.

thick air=drag

More drag=less distance

Same for any wing.

My tests show about 10% loss in the winter.
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Postby Weebl » Sun Feb 04, 2007 9:18 pm

Bradley Walker wrote:
black udder wrote:Blake can probably explain all the physics on why it does/doesn't happen, but from my experience, you do lose some distance.


Colder air is substantially thicker than hot air.

thick air=drag

More drag=less distance

Same for any wing.

My tests show about 10% loss in the winter.

I'd say noticably less stability difference than elevation change. Thicker air doesn't mean less distance, it means you can get higher shots with the nose down. To me that's more distance.
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Postby domromer » Sun Feb 04, 2007 9:43 pm

does that also mean that your should throw further in Phoenix. than in a similar altitude in a moist climate.
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Postby Tree Seeking Device » Sun Feb 04, 2007 9:54 pm

For anybody who wants to geek out ... aerodynamics is a hard habit to kick :)

At 32 F, air is 5% more viscous and 7% denser than air at 70F. For reference, that density difference is equivalent to an altitude drop of about 2000 feet.

At 0 F it's 10% more viscous and 15% denser than air at 70F (equivalent altitude drop of about 4500 feet).

higher density = more lift = more understable
higher viscosity = more drag = less distance.

I've read somewhere that stability is affected by both lift and drag ... so stability changes may not be as significant as the altitude numbers suggest.

Of course if your fingers are too numb to grip the disc it doesn't matter how it flies ...
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