My throw

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My throw

Postby jw34 » Sun Jun 22, 2008 3:42 pm

Here's my throw from this morning. I'm trying to slow things down a little to get my mechanics right.
Suggestions are appreciated.

http://s265.photobucket.com/albums/ii22 ... rowing.flv
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Postby black udder » Sun Jun 22, 2008 6:53 pm

Most obvious is huge nose up issues :( Take comfort in the fact you're not alone. Try different grips to help with it.

Also, you can get more over the disc to help with that. Pull the disc across your chest a little higher, too.

Also, you need to pull the disc closer to your chest. It probably feels really close, but if you look at the video (the 2nd shot specifically) you'll see that the disc is about a foot away from your chest and your shoulders are turned away already.

What you need is to have the disc inside the crook of your arm as it passes your right pec, then gets slung out. You'll get more snap.
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Postby jw34 » Sun Jun 22, 2008 7:13 pm

Thanks a lot for the input. Yeah the nose up is on the list with probably about 12 other things I need to remember when I throw. Or I should say practice enough that I shouldn't have to think about them when I throw!

I'm trying a new grip too. I've been using a control grip for a long time but have switched to a power grip just recently. It's weird though that I feel better with a 2 finger grip than a 3 finger. My hands are such that 4 just feels really strange. Add that with all that I'm trying to take in from the great articles on this site, and I'm a little overwhelmed.
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Postby Lakewoodhillsdgleague » Sun Jun 22, 2008 7:30 pm

I use only two fingers for my power grip as well. I don't know if this is true but it seems like common sense that the less fingers you have on the rim the less resistance you'll have.
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Postby jw34 » Sun Jun 22, 2008 7:46 pm

So would the number of fingers used in a grip have an effect on nose-up or is that pretty much all about wrist angle?
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Postby Lakewoodhillsdgleague » Sun Jun 22, 2008 8:06 pm

Never really thought about it but I suppose it could depending on the way the disc lies in your hand with the amount of fingers you use. I would say it's mostly wrist, and arm angle though....
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Postby black udder » Sun Jun 22, 2008 9:42 pm

With a grip, you want to find something that allows you to control the disc well - i.e. hold it in place without slipping, and yet allows for a single pivot point in the grip. The Climo/fork grip is an index finger rip point, just pinch between the index and thumb while the rest of the fingers support the grip and allow control of the disc.

I agree with others that suggest that the 2 or 3 finger grip is weaker than a 4 or fork grip. I think the appeal of the 2 or 3 finger grip is it might be easier for the disc to rip out. However, the downside is if you don't pull through in a straight line, the disc is going to slip out easier, too.

I just heard a quote from the NFL that applies here, too. When you know 100% what you're doing, it allows you to play faster. It's the same thing with DG as well. Once you don't have to think about everything you need to do off the tee, throwing gets easier and allows you to throw better because you don't have to think about as much.

I can't stress enough how you need to break things down, figure out what you need to work on, then do them 1-2 at a time until you have them. I'd give each step as long as it takes to get it before moving on.

First suggestion would be to start from a standing still position. Get your basic throw down first. Hip rotation, straight pull from back to front and close to your chest. Find your snap and then, once you have some reasonable distance with that motion, move up to an x-step and see if it improves your distance. If it doesn't, work on that x-step.
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Postby jw34 » Sun Jun 22, 2008 10:17 pm

This reminds me of learning to play the drums many (many) years ago. A teacher told me how could I expect to play something fast if I couldn't play it slow? Learning the chops correctly and slower was very hard, but it really made you notice what you were doing.
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Postby JR » Sun Jun 22, 2008 11:02 pm

Your arm is lower at the reach back than it is in the release>instant nose up>slowing down the disc as it gains height>fade early>lost distance. More waist bending forwards should work better.

Two finger power grip allows to keep the muscles loose enough for too much wrist down and still snapping. It ain't easy but possible. Arm vertical plane angle during the pull minus wrist down angle at the release minus waist bend forward angle equals nose angle for level sideways throws.

Throwing steep hyzer or anhyzer also gives nose down even without the above equation being enough for a sideways flat release that stays flat in the air.

Try to point the upper arm at the target. This forces you to bend your elbow setting up snap. Standing still right side towards the target pull the disc slowly across your chest about half an inch away from the chest. Continue the pull so that you can't move the arm forwards. Then your upper arm is at a 90 degree angle to the body straight to the side and if you look at your upper arm the shoulder to elbow line marked by the upper arm points straight at the target.

Memorize this position. You need to reach it on every throw where you're trying to throw far. For the sake of consistency you should throw as many throws as possible like this to avoid problems arising from inconsistency using other mechanics.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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