Wind article

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Wind article

Postby Toney » Fri Mar 31, 2006 3:37 pm

Blake, what can you say about the strength of the wind when it comes to compensating for it? If the wind is around 2 mph, is this significant to start compensating?

Also, I've noted that rollers pretty much follow the same flight patterns in the wind, except maybe more pronounced due to the effect of ground. If I'm rolling into any kind of wind, I can sometimes get the disc to roll way right (turnover) and straight back at me (strong wind here).
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Postby Thatdirtykid » Fri Mar 31, 2006 5:24 pm

wind really messes with rollers, beacuse you always expose the bottom or top of the disc to the wind on a roller. If theres much wind I perfer to not throw rollers unless the wind is coming from just the right angle... (which is very rare ;-) )
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Postby Blake_T » Sat Apr 01, 2006 1:11 am

there is no general rule for wind compensation since it is always changing and generally always variable.

i personally don't do much variation until it's about 20mph and i treat gusts differently from constant.

rollers can get messed up badly from wind in two ways.
1) left/right winds provide kite action, and a lot of this depends on the angle on the ground which dictates the direction they travel. most people land them pointed about 20 degrees to the left.

2) pre-roll flight. if i'm cranking a distance roller i want to cover 300'+ of air before i land... tail and head winds wreak havoc on this w/ landing angles, being able to turn it enough, etc.
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Postby felixtibs » Thu Sep 25, 2008 12:57 pm

i still need clarification. Even in its simplicity it still remains more complicated than it should be.

1)Throwing into a headwind of moderate force, how does one compensate and adjust their throw?

2)Same for TW

I seem to think if you are throwing into a HW, throw an overstable disc with the nose down but pretty much the same as always. Right?
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Postby black udder » Thu Sep 25, 2008 1:25 pm

Best thing is experience.

Most winds don't make much of a difference (unless you're in one of those "gusty" states/regions. In that case, you'd have plenty of experience.

Into a stiff headwind, you'd throw a more overstable disc or heavy version of your stable disc the same way you'd throw your shot. If you throw hyzer or anhyzer, odds are you'll expose the bottom or top of the disc to the wind even more.

Tailwind would be the reverse.

I wouldn't up the overstability of the disc too much because a head wind isn't going to allow you to throw discs too overstable for you, they'll just fade hard and get blown by the wind.
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Postby Blake_T » Thu Sep 25, 2008 2:39 pm

when going into the wind, the most important thing to consider is the virtual added speed onto the disc.

on a nose down throw the headwind increases the speed over the top of the disc by that margin (or at least similarly to it).

let's say that a beast starts to turn at 35mph. if your normal throw peaks at 40mph, you can get a gentle S-curve out of the beast. if there's a 20mph headwind, the beast will behave like it's been thrown ~60mph and the likely result would be a roller.

to get that gentle s-curve flight into a 20mph headwind, you would want a disc that turns at more like 50-55mph in calm conditions.

in terms of height compensation, this is where people fail most. since your discs will fly more understable, they will turn more, and they will need more height to recover from that turn. keeping the disc too low is the easiest way to end up with an undesired cut roller.

tailwinds are trickier, and this is more of a feel thing than science for me. i look at things like wind push. generally, i usually know how high i was intending to throw something and i guesstimate how much higher i need to throw based on experience.
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Postby jnecessary » Thu Sep 25, 2008 10:59 pm

Blake_T wrote:let's say that a beast starts to turn at 35mph. if your normal throw peaks at 40mph, you can get a gentle S-curve out of the beast. if there's a 20mph headwind, the beast will behave like it's been thrown ~60mph and the likely result would be a roller.

to get that gentle s-curve flight into a 20mph headwind, you would want a disc that turns at more like 50-55mph in calm conditions.



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