Cyclists

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Re: Cyclists

Postby chiggins » Sun Mar 28, 2010 9:46 pm

Quite a coincidence!

A buddy came through town on his way to Richmond for the Handmade Bike show, and his touring bike was an old lugged Stumpie with 2" Marathons, a Nitto Persiscope stem and Nitto Rando bars. The seat top was half-way between the tops and the drops, very Grant-Peterson-Approved looking, but they looked all-day comfortable too.

I have Noodle bars on my Trucker, which are great, super comfy bars, but they're pretty low for a touring bike (because I bought mine used and my fork's cut too). I'd been thinking about trying Mustache bars or maybe Albatross bars (since I've had great success with them so far), but after looking at his, I realized my bars might just be perfect if I rode the drops about where Mustache bars would be, and the tops would become like riser flat bars.

So tonight I put one of those Dimension extenders on and re-did the brake cabling. It looks goofy as all get out, but it's a cheap test to see how I like the Touring Super-Comfort cockpit. If it works out I'll replace the extender and stock stem with this high-rise from Soma. 120mm, 40 degree rise, 26.0mm clamp. Bingo. And if that doesn't work out, I'll have the height and cables already set up for Mustache bars anyway. I'll letch'all know how it works out.



Oh! Finished building the wheels for Bonnie, did up her bars and got her running. I got back from test riding her around the block and my wife came downstairs with a bag she said she'd been saving since Christmas. It's hard to see from here, but it's the saddle, a lovely sparkle blue Soma like these. Good saddle and purdy too :)

Image

It's been a long time since I've had a decent skinny-tire bike, and to be honest I wasn't even sure I was going to be into it after spending so much time pushing big bikes around on fat tires. But boy howdy it's a nice piece of bygawd steel and it rides like a dream.

Ahahahahaha I like it!

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Re: Cyclists

Postby marmoset » Mon Mar 29, 2010 5:59 am

Mmmmmm... steeeel... lugged steel...
Nice job on the wheels. I meet so many people who are afraid to lace their own.
I hate wrapping bars. I'm too much of a perfectionist.

I like your bike. I'm a huge fan of 1" quills, freewheels, and downtubes. They weren't "broke" but they still got "fixed."
Golf is a lot of walking, broken up by disappointment and bad arithmetic. ~Author Unknown
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Re: Cyclists

Postby some call me...tim? » Mon Mar 29, 2010 8:46 am

chiggins wrote:Ahahahahaha I like it!

Image


I have nothing to add to the bike discussion, but mad props on the Modern Problems reference. Just got that from Netflix the other day and am excited to watch it again after all these years.
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Re: Cyclists

Postby chiggins » Mon Mar 29, 2010 9:00 am

marmoset wrote:Mmmmmm... steeeel... lugged steel...
Nice job on the wheels. I meet so many people who are afraid to lace their own.


I decided last year that, with the number of bikes in the family stable I have to maintain, learning to build and true wheels would end up saving us hundreds of dollars a year. So I jumped in with this book, which was blind luck in a way since Roger Musson's methodology also includes how to build your own stand, truing gauges (mine are made of legos), and nipple drivers. Ya know what else is great about that? Saying "nipple driver". Good name for a band... oh wait, nevermind :)

marmoset wrote:I hate wrapping bars. I'm too much of a perfectionist.


Embrace your perfectionism and learn how to do these. Then I can send you my bars.

I like your bike. I'm a huge fan of 1" quills, freewheels, and downtubes. They weren't "broke" but they still got "fixed."


Thanks! Me too, it ain't gonna win any crits, but it sure makes my soul sing when I'm riding. I think that's going to be (or maybe already is) the next movement in cycling: OUT => suffering, IN => bliss. I likey the bliss.

You get out on that tandem smile-maker at all this weekend?
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Re: Cyclists

Postby chiggins » Mon Mar 29, 2010 9:07 am

some call me...tim? wrote:I have nothing to add to the bike discussion, but mad props on the Modern Problems reference. Just got that from Netflix the other day and am excited to watch it again after all these years.


Every so often, in response to some annoyance, I'll remark to anyone in earshot, "I don't have to take this shit. I'm a goddam good lookin' man!" Dabney Coleman would've stolen that show from anyone but Chevy.
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Re: Cyclists

Postby chiggins » Mon Mar 29, 2010 10:05 am

marmoset wrote:Chiggins, uNicedmeMan-
I noticed you are both running the Brooks saddles.
How much maintenance do you have to put into them? Have you noticed oily/greasy spots on your shorts? How long do they take to break in? I've read lots about them but everyone I know that has one just got theirs. They don't have many miles on them.


Meant to come back to this, sorry :)

I bought a B-67s for my wife's bike, it's sprung and just a little shorter than a B-67 (women's geometry), and it was La-Z-Boy comfortable from day 1. Mine was a Brooks Professional that came with the Trucker, and after a year and a half of getting pounded by it I gave up. It hurt the same on the last day as it did on the first, but I haven't had anyone look at it to see if the previous owner ruined the tension, so it might be fixable.

If I was gonna do it again, they make a B-17 with springs that looks like exactly what I'd want for a tourer, but Velo Orange also makes some leather saddles that are said to be worth checking out.
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Re: Cyclists

Postby marmoset » Mon Mar 29, 2010 10:23 am

chiggins wrote:Embrace your perfectionism and learn how to do these. Then I can send you my bars.

I'll get right on it :D
I haven't seen that before, looks sweet.

You get out on that tandem smile-maker at all this weekend?

Nope; rain rain rain. Deluges at times.
Funny you call it a smile-maker. Most people call them divorce-machines. But I have a great stoker... 100 pounds of muscle. She's faster than me but she likes to hammer and I like to spin... so we compromise and I hammer :lol:
She loves cuising in the 53x11. I have NO IDEA how she does that!

...but Velo Orange also makes some leather saddles that are said to be worth checking out.

I saw those before but I haven't heard of anyone who has one. Guess I need to check out roadbikereview.

OUT => suffering, IN => bliss. I likey the bliss.
Perfectly stated; can I sig this?
Golf is a lot of walking, broken up by disappointment and bad arithmetic. ~Author Unknown
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Re: Cyclists

Postby chiggins » Mon Mar 29, 2010 10:25 am

marmoset wrote:
OUT => suffering, IN => bliss. I likey the bliss.
Perfectly stated; can I sig this?


Soitanly!
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Re: Cyclists

Postby uNicedmeMan » Tue Mar 30, 2010 6:56 am

Creighton- That bike you made for your old lady is f'in sweet. So classy. I too love the look of the quill stem, the paint color and the seat.

chiggins wrote:I have Noodle bars on my Trucker, which are great, super comfy bars, but they're pretty low for a touring bike (because I bought mine used and my fork's cut too). I'd been thinking about trying Mustache bars or maybe Albatross bars (since I've had great success with them so far), but after looking at his, I realized my bars might just be perfect if I rode the drops about where Mustache bars would be, and the tops would become like riser flat bars.

So tonight I put one of those Dimension extenders on and re-did the brake cabling. It looks goofy as all get out, but it's a cheap test to see how I like the Touring Super-Comfort cockpit. If it works out I'll replace the extender and stock stem with this high-rise from Soma. 120mm, 40 degree rise, 26.0mm clamp. Bingo. And if that doesn't work out, I'll have the height and cables already set up for Mustache bars anyway. I'll letch'all know how it works out.


I'm quite interested in the results of this experiment. Keep me posted. I'm still thinking about some Albatross bars on there with wood grips and a front basket (in my mind this would be the perfect city doing stuff machine, but a little limited elsewhere). I'm also thinking about putting one of those Wald folding rear baskets on for spontaneous toting.
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Re: Cyclists

Postby marmoset » Tue Mar 30, 2010 7:29 am

Why use wooden grips when you can have...
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Re: Cyclists

Postby uNicedmeMan » Tue Mar 30, 2010 7:34 am

^^^Really? I wonder what durability is like with those? I would be afraid to clamp em down.

And pardon my ignorance but can someone please explain:

OUT => suffering, IN => bliss. I likey the bliss.

I feel dumb.
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Re: Cyclists

Postby marmoset » Tue Mar 30, 2010 8:14 am

OUT => suffering, IN => bliss. I likey the bliss.

My super-duper road bike is super duper fast. And super duper harsh.
I'd rather be slow and comfy because I'm out there to have fun.
I know my geometry isn't quite optimized yet but my road bikes leave me feeling achy. Too low and stretched out, too much pressure on the hands, too much strain on the back. Sitting more upright on a reasonable saddle and resting on higher handlebars is where its at.

I have no idea how durable those bars are but I wouldn't be afraid to clamp down on them. Wood has good compressive strength, especially with a more evenly distributed load like a stem/bar interface.
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Re: Cyclists

Postby chiggins » Tue Mar 30, 2010 10:40 am

marmoset wrote:
OUT => suffering, IN => bliss. I likey the bliss.

My super-duper road bike is super duper fast. And super duper harsh.
I'd rather be slow and comfy because I'm out there to have fun.
I know my geometry isn't quite optimized yet but my road bikes leave me feeling achy. Too low and stretched out, too much pressure on the hands, too much strain on the back. Sitting more upright on a reasonable saddle and resting on higher handlebars is where its at.


Right. Part of it's that bikes that win races aren't built to be particularly kind or comfy. A time trial bike, like those popular with the triathalon crowd, are all about suffering. And that's cool, 'cause that's kinda the point of a triathalon. An LHT, on the other hand, is a bliss machine.

The other aspect of suffering/bliss is the kind of riding one does.

This is suffering, and some people were meant for this kind of thing. This is bliss. Tell me Joe Breeze doesn't look like he's thinking about how awesome his life is right there :)

I did a century last year, the Livestrong Challenge in Philly. I trained up for it, and it still beat me up pretty good. I did about 100 miles (plus 20 more for the trip from/to the hotel) and about 8500 feet of climbing in about 7 hours on my Trucker. I'm glad I did it, it was a valuable experience, and I have nothing bad to say about doin' centuries. But after it was over I thought a lot about whether or not I was interested in pursuing more of that kind of riding and came to the conclusion that I'm much more into balloon tires, trips up the C&O with the kids, and quick sprints to Wonderland's patio for a beer and a sausage bacon cheese burger. If I'm gonna do any more centuries, they're going to take a lot longer than 7 hours and there's going to be more than one stop for pie and coffee.
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Re: Cyclists

Postby uNicedmeMan » Tue Mar 30, 2010 11:20 am

Thanks for clearing that up doods. I've always been more for the leisure/utility/fun side of biking, it fits my personality.

chiggins- Does your neighbor Andy ride anymore? He told me he used to be a bike messenger down in South America or something. Can you comment on your schwalbe's a little bit? Did you have the stock Continental's before?
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Re: Cyclists

Postby Jsw » Tue Mar 30, 2010 12:49 pm

Hey, looking to pick up a bike this summer. Something to just take to the beach for cruising back and forth to the beach or grabbing a six pack.

I'm thinking a single speed road bike would suit me just fine, as I could cruise on it - as well as get places with some haste(I feel like the wicked witch of the west on a "beach cruiser" :lol: )

Any suggestions on an inexpensive model? I was told a Motobecane Messanger was a decent grab at around $300.

Thanks
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