Quantifying the Right Pec Drill

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Re: Quantifying the Right Pec Drill

Postby JR » Mon Dec 26, 2011 5:15 pm

JHern wrote:
masterbeato wrote:...the difficult part that most people fail to do is opening the wrist completely at the end to release the disc and fling it out of the hand after the wrist extension takes place...


I think I fall into this category. I can throw 375' with no run up, but getting up to the 450' category has thus far escaped me...but I know I can get there, and I will eventually. Adding a run-up doesn't always help. When I watch video of myself, I can see that I'm missing something at the end of the throw, my arm doesn't feel the urge so much to follow through the hit. When I try to force my arm to follow through, it just feels forced, not like it is powering through the hit and out with violence. Put another way: I'm great at pausing the shoulder turn when they are neutral, which allows me to "half hit" it, but still terrible when it comes to cranking up the angular momentum again at the hit. I should probably just shut up, go back to the garage, and do right pec drills, until I get it.

masterbeato wrote:...the wrist can only open with a rapid re-direction of the forearm. which most people fail to do...


By rapid re-direction, do you mean as part of the elbow chop, rotating the forearm from closed to open? Or do you mean a sudden sideways motion of the forearm just at the hit?


Or both maybe? Thinking of powering the arm to go far in the follow through (watch Markus Källström, Simon Lizotte for example) changes my distribution of powering even though i think my timing is mostly the same. I just get more power in the sideways motion of the entire arm from the shoulder socket. The addition of D is small for me but it is always there. I also can't swing the arm right fast before i'm well warmed up. My shoulder blade collides with back muscles and loosening the muscles helps in taking away resistance. Don't know how the big boys do it.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Quantifying the Right Pec Drill

Postby JHern » Tue Dec 27, 2011 12:56 am

I think powering through the follow-through (my pause is actually a stop, instead of a pause) is the last thing for me to learn in terms of generating big snap. I sometimes have the privilege of playing with big snap players, and I see what they do, I can see the wrist wagging and plyometrically bending, etc., and I also know intellectually what is supposed to happen. It's just a matter of getting my body to do it. I know what to do to get there, just have to get off my arse and do it.
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Re: Quantifying the Right Pec Drill

Postby JR » Tue Dec 27, 2011 2:59 am

There is also the matter of the speed of the nervous system and the ratio of the fastest twitch cells to the rest of the muscle cells in the arm and top power level. It doesn't hurt to increase speed and power in the muscle opposite the bicep by training it. But to really get the wrist to bend and the tendons to stretch turning faster after the pause will create even more acceleration. Now if you could fight against the wrist bending back, but not lock it to unbending and then do the steely stop, you'd be doing things better. I don't know about healthy people, because i haven't been healthy in all of my DG career, but i think there is a minimum amount of power you need to have in the wrist going in both directions. Resisting the bend and having the brakes. Powerball and dumbell training with possibly cable work as well. It is dangerous to do those and you must do those exercises right from the get go and start with few reps and light weights like a couple of pounds. The thing is that if you don't take it easy early on you'll get inflammations or worse. So i'd get training tips from professionals. I'm stuck with a bum arm for life from tendon damage. It can ruin a DG career too get bad tendon damage. It's safer for DG career to break bones than tendons.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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