Critique please

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Critique please

Postby vtbuzzz » Sun Oct 14, 2012 6:14 am

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnyAJ7W ... ata_player

So after reading more and now that our season is over I wanna start working on my drive again. I'm using more of my body and less arm now.
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Re: Critique please

Postby dgdave » Sun Oct 14, 2012 6:44 am

How the hell did the dog not fuck you up?
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Re: Critique please

Postby JR » Sun Oct 14, 2012 6:49 am

If you aren't willing to risk charges by kicking that dog how about rat poison or tying it up if you can't leave it home? No other suggestion improves your throwing more. Effing trippers. Tripping dog. insert that MJ hound image here bloody saboteur :twisted: :lol:

It is difficult to do a throw analysis of such a form without knowing what you were trying to achieve. You form is neither the best for accuracy and consistency or distance but a halfway mark with cons from both. The worst of both worlds is never a good thing. For accuracy see my sig. For more distance add a run up and keep on doing that curved throw but minding that throwing an anny not a flat shot that way adds even more D. If the disc didn't turn over. Which for that power input would have to be a fairly mild disc.

Your reach back distance limited by the leg pointing direction is for an accuracy throw. If you were going for D you need to turn the heels and the back on the target in the x and plant step.

You have enough ball of the foot height in the heel pivot for good tees but no safety margin for rough tees or second shots. It is good that you have some hip twist and shoulder turn but they can be more emphasized.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Critique please

Postby vtbuzzz » Sun Oct 14, 2012 8:07 am

Dave about the dog, she is my disc golf partner and I'm used to her...she doesn't really mess up my drives because I know I'm not gonna hit her. :) and she doesn't do that on all drives, just a few select throws throughout the round...otherwise she is off in the woods mouse hunting or sitting behind the box watching.

Jr in that drive I am going for accuracy and a 350 foot drive, the disc in hand is an echo star valk. Where in that video does it look like I'm throwing anny, that isn't my intention. I always thought I was doing a run up I suppose I thought wrong. I'm more concerned with accuracy than distance as our courses are all through the woods in Vermont...and I mostly throw understable because of this.
Last edited by vtbuzzz on Sun Oct 14, 2012 9:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Critique please

Postby vtbuzzz » Sun Oct 14, 2012 9:15 am

Should I be driving my left hip forward harder?
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Re: Critique please

Postby JR » Mon Oct 15, 2012 1:19 pm

vtbuzzz wrote:Should I be driving my left hip forward harder?


Very much so. Now you aren't getting much power at all from the hips. See my signature. You were starting from the right side of the tee and moving to the left from there a classic accuracy running direction for an anhyzer. Don't get me wrong the way you move is good form for a lot of weight shift that helps in distance throws. The cons to not moving in a straight line in a max accuracy throw come from not being able to push to face the target when you're moving slowly and are tired or don't have enough space to get enough momentum to get positioned properly and on slippery tees. Any of those miss sources lead to missing left big time. Consistency across all conditions and even on off days is compromised with your form. And the distance department needs a run up before your current form. Then it is a perfectly legit way to throw a fast overstable disc anhyzered.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Re: Critique please

Postby vtbuzzz » Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:18 pm

[

I unfortunately primarily use tapatalk so I can see your Sig, but ill look at it later.
So the main reason for my standing to the right of the tee on all my throws is from watching Brinster drive...I have been trying to emulate his technique a little. And it looks like he always came from that side...so working in a straight line is ideal in terms of consistency sake, if I'm understanding right? If so I need to work on fixing that first...I can see how moving right to left for a straight drive would add another unnecessary variable. Thank you for that. Will post video again soon.
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Re: Critique please

Postby JR » Tue Oct 16, 2012 6:46 am

Now that you got the generic idea i feel more at ease with confusing the issue and you and leaving you to experiment with two styles to see which works the best for you after getting comfortable with both so that you can make an educated decision. Keeping in mind that short term gain may limit the best potential if you choose the way with the less growth potential.

The confusion comes from the fact that different people gain accuracy with different ways of throwing. I imagine anyone throwing with 100 % arm power from the plant loses in consistency. Some are the most consistent throwing super smooth at very low power and some are way better with a quickly accelerating snap in the end of the throw. Throwing to different distances means any individual has to make shot planning and picking the best way to throw. For a snappy accurate thrower the snap creates a lot of power so they need to generate little power elsewhere or they risk overthrowing. The pro is that the accurate distance is way longer when you can let loose and not hold back with other parts of the throw and on short distances moving so slowly that you can't slip easily on the ground etc.

Depending on the distance you are throwing to and how your best disc behaves a curved x step thrower will gain more power from more weight shift. If for that distance and the disc you need more power the curved throw would reduce the wrist roll chances because you don't need to yank balls out with the arm. Which you need to do for the same distance with a straight line x step. It is very individual if you need that little bit of extra power from a curved x step. For some it can be beneficial and for others a drag. YMMV and only testing both ways can resolve the issue for you.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Critique please

Postby vtbuzzz » Tue Oct 23, 2012 6:11 am

So when you say curved you mean the way I was doing it in the video? I guess I'm a bit confused by what you mean. I did try the straight on approach at a casual tournament this past weekend where I was using the straight on approach. I was having success keeping my disc in the fairway. I even scored pretty well despite my lack of sobriety. So which way was the harder way with better results in the long run.
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Re: Critique please

Postby JR » Thu Oct 25, 2012 9:39 am

To be more precise you moved in a straight line from rear right to front left so a classic anhyzer. A curved x step moves from rear right to center of the tee with the first two steps and the plant step moves to the right of where the x step was going.

People are gonna get differing results to which running way is more accurate based on where they are in their learning curve and what is the limiting factor to accuracy. Once people learn to aim with the heavy feel of the disc that increases the accuracy dramatically and for them whichever way gets enough late acceleration first will probably be more accurate. Just because people tend to stick to what works first and having a jump in accuracy from at least partial snap will see clear accuracy gains. If power generation with the arm and the torso is a problem i would not wonder if someone turning more of the back at the target and getting more weight shift possibly running in a curve too could get the late acceleration first in this way. Does a curve offer more ultimate simplicity thus fewer sources of errors? Not vs a straight at the target running and moving in a straight line as long as you can accept the lesser power generation of the direct line running. You can always use two forms with curve running on an open area that needs the extra distance.

People can learn a lot and get proficient with less than optimal form for future growth potential. A lot depends on how much time you are willing to invest and what trade offs you are willing to take to gain which advantages. Ultimately only a lot of throwing on open and tight holes will tell which way is the most accurate in the long run for you. And you need to compare the forms along your growth as a player because you may gain enough muscle strength to overcome limits that may make a straight run poor in accuracy if you need to gun beyond your consistent power. There is a good reason to why some pros try to avoid throwing at 100 % power. Wrist rolls etc. from the smaller muscles of the body not being able to handle the forces created by the large muscle groups together. An unfair fight. The wrist area has quite little muscle power vs legs+core+shoulders and the elbow chopping related muscles added to by the momentum and weight shift.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Critique please

Postby vtbuzzz » Wed Oct 31, 2012 5:37 am

Jr
Thank you so much for your insight...I will post another video soon with updated form. I have been so busy and haven't had time to go out and field train or even play a round. But just wanted you to know I'm reading and using what you said to heart.
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