How to deal with the cold?

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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby iacas » Thu Nov 01, 2012 9:09 am

Stay inside.

Or play hockey instead.

Those are my plans for the winter. I don't golf in lousy weather and I don't imagine playing disc golf in lousy weather either.
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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby mikes919 » Thu Nov 01, 2012 11:49 am

I'll play a few times during the winter when it's really crappy out. Gore-tex shoes, smartwool socks, waterproof north face pants, a comfortable jacket with layers. Mittens (not gloves) with handwarmers to keep your fingers warm and flexible. That's about it. I've done the ribbon taped to the bottom of the disc and it really works. I've also used glowsticks (like for night golf) and you're able to see the discs under the snow. I'll play as long as it's over 20 degrees.

This time of year it's no problem, just layer up a little bit and wear some gloves. If you don't play under 50 degrees then your season is pretty short around here. The time of year that really sucks here in Chicago is March-April, when it's still cold but the courses are swamps from the melting snow. It's not even worth it to play then.
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How to deal with the cold?

Postby Dcon67 » Thu Nov 01, 2012 12:57 pm

I use a reusable zippo hand warmer in my right hand pocket (although I also carry a couple disposable ones in my bag, just in case) for my throwing hand. A glove on my non throwing hand, Kahtoola micro spikes are worn over high top gortex hiking shoes if its snowy or icy, and for deep snow ill also wear gators and snow pants to keep snow out of my shoes and myself dry.

Also, when playing in snow leave your disks outside overnight beforehand. Otherwise snow tends to cling to them. if the disk is cold you can just give it a quick knock, and the snow falls right off leaving the disk dry.

As others have mentioned curling ribbon and duct tape is the key to locating them in deep snow. I usually do up 5-10 discs with ribbon after the first snow and it lasts all winter if done properly.

Oh yeah, you'll need an insulated container to pour your beer in. Beer freezes and gets slushy when its down around zero out.
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Re: Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby vtbuzzz » Thu Nov 01, 2012 6:45 pm

"Also, when playing in snow leave your disks outside overnight beforehand. Otherwise snow tends to cling to them. if the disk is cold you can just give it a quick knock, and the snow falls right off leaving the disk dry."

This is extremely important when playing in the snow. Just leave your bag in your car. But make sure you keep your nalgenes inside because apparently in 20 degree weather they don't defrost. :)
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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby Jesse B 707 » Fri Nov 02, 2012 4:06 pm

Try keeping your hands inside your vagina for warmth... ;) It doesn't actually get cold here, I'd probably just not play lol.
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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby chickenonabun » Fri Nov 02, 2012 7:32 pm

I'm loling at people in Texas saying anything about it being cold.
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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby allsport1313 » Fri Nov 02, 2012 7:45 pm

it was 94 today, I actually brought my Uggs out
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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby rusch_bag » Fri Nov 02, 2012 11:06 pm

I can't believe what I am reading. I also find it hilarious that the only people that say they throw with a glove on have been from Texas. Even if it is negative out I will take my glove off to throw. Grow a pair.
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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby JR » Sat Nov 03, 2012 1:25 pm

I forgot to mention that no matter where and how cold the cool weather is properly functioning large enough thermos flask with hot liquid helps a ton. I switched to a larger size original Thermos flask this season vs a no name smaller flask and now i need to watch out to avoid burning my lips with water warmed up with a coffee machine vs boiling water poured into the smaller no name half useless flask. You would not believe the difference it makes. I once saw a TV program that said that top class cross country skiers drink hot fluid every 20 minutes with about two gulps amount. I imagine they meant large gulps. I could not pull that off now with the award winning original 1 liter Thermos flask i have now with coffee machine heated water. Which is cooler than boiled water. A review i saw of the model i have said that boiled water was at 80 C after 8 hours and i can't say i am surprised.
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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby inthedrift » Sat Nov 03, 2012 7:17 pm

JR is spot on, the Thermos is a wonderful thing.
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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby Monocacy » Sat Nov 03, 2012 8:02 pm

Winter bonus - after the leaves fall, the branches lift up and the fairways get bigger. Worth putting on a few layers, imo.
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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby Mark Ellis » Sun Nov 04, 2012 7:04 am

Crunkjuice wrote:I started playing heavily this summer in the Texas heat. Now that its starting to drop temperatures, i'm wondering how you guys (northerners especially) deal with cold hands for disc golf? Do you guys throw with gloves on, wear gloves in between throws, hand warmers NFL style?


There is much gear and many techniques in dealing with the cold, depending on the condition and the particular need of the player.

At a tournament last weekend I was in many layers and just a little cold the way I was dressed. I saw a player in blue jeans and a tee shirt standing around between rounds: no jacket, no hat, no gloves. I asked if he was immune to the cold. He said, "Pretty much". Of course it was only in the low 40's with a strong, biting wind and rain so it wasn't actually cold, just cold for Fall.

Everyone is different. Personally I spend little attention to my lower extremities, legs and feet. I don't even care if my feet get wet until it is below zero ( not below freezing at 32 degrees but below 0 degrees F). Until a few years ago I didn't wear a hat until it got bitter. Getting old diminishes cold tolerance.

What I find important is warmth for my throwing hand and warmth for the body's core. But being too warm is worse than being too cold, as that sweat is going to freeze on you. So the goal is to have enough stuff to hit the fine line between hot and cold, knowing that more warmth equals more bulk and bulk restricts movement. For maximum warmth and minimum bulk the key is thin layers and high tech fabrics. Most golfers rely on multiple tee shirts covered with a hoody (so all cotton) and if it works for them, so be it. Having tested darn near everything, I recommend a base layer of polyester (thin, lightweight, moisture wicking) followed by layers (as needed) of various fabrics and warmth, then topped with a lightweight, unlined shell of either nylon or polyester ( wind and water resistant).

A big, thick, bulky jacket is useless to me. Even in very cold temperatures how cold it feels varies from moment to moment and so do you. ( Wind is more important than temperature in terms of how cold it feels. Your activity changes your needs: standing around feels much colder than tromping through deep snow, which btw is a serious workout.). Thin layers can be added or subtracted and carried with you. Try stuffing a big winter coat in your golf bag!

A few of the essential items:
Oversized, polartech mittens. Mittens are superior to any glove. They are warmer and go on and off easier (your hand WILL get wet in snow or rain and make it very frustrating if you have tight gloves). Few players can throw effectively in gloves and gloves do not allow adequate dexterity for most tasks. Take off the mitten to do a task (throw, clean off a disc, tie a shoelace, etc) replace it to regain warmth. If it gets cold enough add handwarmers inside them.

Disposable handwarmers. These little packets are air activated and easy to use. I have tried the various fuel handwarmers ( dirty smelly fuel sticks and the butane heaters) and they are too much trouble and less effective. I buy handwarmers in bulk and a pack of 2 costs about 40 cents and lasts most of a full day ( 2 rounds).

Polartech (soft polyester weave) neckwarmer/neck cowl: Shockingly warm and effective. They hold your body heat in. They go on and off in a second and weigh near nothing. After a good mitten, the best single item you can add to your winter wardrobe.

Polartech Vest. This add warmth to the core without much weight and doesn't restrict movement like a full coat. Easy to pop on and off.

Sheet metal screws drilled into the bottom of boots: If you want traction in snow and ice, nothing else is as effective. You can play on a frozen lake in these.

Becoming acclimated to the cold is something to be embraced, not avoided. Early in the season go out in it and you make it easier on yourself for the rest of the winter.
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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby JR » Sun Nov 04, 2012 7:19 am

Mark i get so much better traction with spike/chain combination add ons to the shoes and the good thing is that they are not permanent additions to the shoes and can be put on and taken off in a jiffy. The surface area and grip of chains is vastly superior to screws or spikes. There is a reason why military vehicles have chains added to the wheels instead of merely spikes in the winter. Try it and be prepared to be surprised pleasantly. Mine are made in the Czech republic so they might not be available in the US but i've seen a couple versions from different manufacturers in the US Kahtoola being the only one i remember off the top of my head. I recommend against half way models that have a rubber frame around which thin wire is spun. Yeah they have good traction and surface area but they wear quicker and are flimsier so they drop off far more easily. Tightness over your shoe is a must because even those drop occasionally off of the shoe wading in deeper snow.

Texans suffering from cold now? Stop playing in the night :-)
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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby iacas » Sun Nov 04, 2012 7:43 am

JR wrote:Mark i get so much better traction with spike/chain combination add ons to the shoes and the good thing is that they are not permanent additions to the shoes and can be put on and taken off in a jiffy.

I haven't played in snow or ice (and don't think I plan to), but I run outdoors in the winter and have used YakTrax with pretty darn good results.

Under Armour as a base layer is great. The stuff is available in multiple thicknesses. I have plenty of jackets from golf too so into the worst weather (if I was to play) I could easily get by with:

a) Under Armour
b) t-shirt or something just to have a style
c) jacket
d) thermal hat

Replace the jacket with a hoodie if there's NO chance of much wind or getting it wet at all (golf jackets tend to be waterproof but still allow flexibility).

Down below it's similar: thermal underwear + something that won't absorb water (golf rain pants work well here as well - but hunting pants might be better at avoiding rips and tears from branches and things).

My legs are fine in the cold. I can run in shorts down to 35 or so.
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Re: How to deal with the cold?

Postby JR » Sun Nov 04, 2012 8:25 am

Snow is abrasive especially if it is icy so that is why i think the sturdy hunting pants i have are good for durability. I own YakTrax and they are more prone to falling of than the much grippier chain/spike assembly i have. YakTrax themselves suggest more limitations on where to use them vs all metal under the shoe spike/chain assemblies. The rubber gets damaged by sand and small rocks on the snow. With those caveats the YakTrax are pretty cool especially in thin snow and they are totally superior to spikes and won't damage the fabric of the trousers. The deeper the snow gets the easier they fall off. Spike/chains can damage the trousers.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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