Critique

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Critique

Postby nick344 » Sun Nov 11, 2012 8:47 pm

Take a look at my throw and give me some pointers please. I have been playing about 1 1/2 months. We had 20+mph today. I was throwing a TeeBird champion plus mold that weighed 165g

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Re: Critique

Postby JR » Mon Nov 12, 2012 2:27 am

Hi Nick welcome to here and to the sport. First off health warning: When you look at the video on Youtube you can pause the video and pressing arrow right the video moves one picture forward. I suggest you do that to see everything you do in your throw but especially regarding the right foot and ankle after the final step has landed. The right foot sole touches the ground with all of the surface area creating so much friction that the foot is stuck to the ground for long enough to get the body rotating right and shifting back to front to the limits of the mobility of the tendons etc. of your ankle. See how far inward the right foot is twisted under the body. That will do damage sooner or later if you maintain that form. That twisting motion hits every joint in the leg and even pulls glutes and all back muscles. To remedy this try lifting the ball of the foot up so that the foot will pivot on the heel to avoid that twist.

Another picture by picture analysis tip comes from where you reach back. See how you move the disc toward the right side of the tee in the reach back. Perspective is from the rear of the tee toward the basket right side. While rotational arm pulls add to power they also make getting accuracy and consistency harder. Because scores are improved more through accuracy than distance i would pull the arm in a straight line for most throws like you'd start a lawn mover, chain saw or boat engine that have a cable to pull from.

The third picture by picture analysis benefit is your hip when the disc leaves. That tilt forward is a great way to help drop the front of the disc down to go under branches. Normally you want to have a straighter upright posture at the rip and you can tilt forward freely after the disc has gone for a slightly faster rotation thus more power generation. Think of a pirouette with mass being as close to the center of the axis of rotation for the fastest rotation.

Unfortunately in this throw your reach back was lower than the rip point so the arm and the disc rose all the way and in the air it must have done the same. It was further compromised flight leading to a high stall because you can improve in your grip and wrist orientation. Everyone starts like that and that is the first change that needs to be made because it masks other form flaws and it is difficult to rectify something you cannot see.

The front of the disc at the rip was much higher than the rear and it came from the wrist being straight and the disc being oriented not so well in the hand. The wrist should be actively pushed down hard around when the elbow starts to straighten. There are hundreds to thousands of grip variations but see the main page of this site in the articles section for good grip tips. Generally people put the disc in the seam of the index and middle finger first and at the rear in the seam of the hand. You can drop the front of the disc down by raising the rear of the disc to the thumb inner joint or even higher if you remove the pinky from inside the disc. Depending on your hand and finger flexibility and strength. Both of which will improve over time so i suggest annual checks for what you can do. Because the arm moves the fastest when the muscles are loose until the elbow starts to straighten i'd pick a grip that does not tense the forearm muscles up too much early in the throw. Pinch hard with the index finger and the thumb against each other after the elbow has started to straighten.

I would also compare you current leg work to what is in my signature to see the differences. Normally you'd expect more distance from the way you throw with some reduction in accuracy and consistency especially on slippery tees and ground.

Your left leg was airborne when the disc left. I suggest reading up on Newton's third law of movement. There is another method of avoiding the resultant power loss where you kick the left leg to the right of the right leg and moving the left leg back to front simultaneously. Raising the left leg up won't counter the opposite reaction (movement) of the elbow straightening, shoulders turning to the right and the hips twisting to the right of neutral. All of those movements add to the power generation timed properly so they should be used.

You got the elbow fairly well ahead of the right side before straightening the elbow and that is way better than most players start with but i would try moving the elbow a couple of inches farther to see if the elbow chop to straight is faster that way.

Your form is pretty good for the time you have played and will be a lot better when you get the discs to fly with the front and the rear at the same height from the ground on lower throws that do not run out of speed prematurely and finish hard left not moving forward once the fade starts.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
JR
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Re: Critique

Postby nick344 » Mon Nov 12, 2012 8:46 am

Thanks for the reply. I will diffently work on all areas you pointed out. Thanks for the health warning.
nick344
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Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:20 pm
Location: North Alabama
Favorite Disc: roc


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