How to get a left to right curve?

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How to get a left to right curve?

Postby south.texas.dead.i » Wed Feb 13, 2013 10:06 am

I cannot seem to get a disc to have a left to right curve in it for big drives. I am trying to figure out how to throw a disc aiming left of the target about 400' away and having it land in line with the target throwing rhbh? What's the technique? Some people say release it with a nose down angle but wouldn't that just make it go straight into the ground?
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Re: How to get a left to right curve?

Postby PMantle » Wed Feb 13, 2013 10:11 am

Understable discs do that for me. Once they turn over, they retain that L to R movement for the rest of the flight. I can do it predictable with:

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How to get a left to right curve?

Postby south.texas.dead.i » Wed Feb 13, 2013 10:20 am

PMantle wrote:Understable discs do that for me. Once they turn over, they retain that L to R movement for the rest of the flight. I can do it predictable with:

Pro Destroyer
Dx Beast
Dx Archangel
Stratus
Leopard (Dx way more than Champion)

So you throw them the exact same way as the overstables?
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Re: How to get a left to right curve?

Postby PMantle » Wed Feb 13, 2013 10:25 am

south.texas.dead.i wrote:
PMantle wrote:Understable discs do that for me. Once they turn over, they retain that L to R movement for the rest of the flight. I can do it predictable with:

Pro Destroyer
Dx Beast
Dx Archangel
Stratus
Leopard (Dx way more than Champion)

So you throw them the exact same way as the overstables?

No, not really. First of all, I carry very little that one would really call overstable. What I do carry is for wind or specific shots.

I generally have to hyzer-flip the ones above because a flat release will send them searching for the ground very quickly. Different winds call for different releases.
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Re: How to get a left to right curve?

Postby keltik » Wed Feb 13, 2013 11:34 am

the shot you are looking for is called a hyzer flip turnover. you need a really flippy disc and some practice. I used to use a beat up X-Avenger for this but the Avenger-SS (ESP or D) can do this out of the box. I also have a TP Northman that is quite flippy in it's new condition. you could also try a roller. RHBH rollers finish to the right.
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Re: How to get a left to right curve?

Postby chunk » Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:00 pm

there are 4 basic shots that make a disc go right to left for a right handed person (more if you count overhead and rollers); anhyzer (aka flexshot), turnover, hyzer flip, and forehand. all are different shots in different spots. check out http://www.innovadiscs.com/home/disc-go ... .html#shot or another disc golf glossary for a description of each shot.
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Re: How to get a left to right curve?

Postby PMantle » Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:56 pm

chunk wrote:turnover, hyzer flip,

How do these differ?
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Re: How to get a left to right curve?

Postby bents » Wed Feb 13, 2013 4:22 pm

PMantle wrote:
chunk wrote:turnover, hyzer flip,

How do these differ?


They overlap a lot. Example of a hyzer flip that isn't a turnover shot: Thrown hyzer, and turns to straight for most of its flight, without actually going left to right. This is for things like tunnel shots where you want a long straight shot with little fade.

Example of a turnover shot that's not a hyzer flip: Thrown straight, and turns to an anhyzer angle.

One that is thrown at a hyzer angle and turns around to anhyzer is both a hyzer flip and a turnover shot.
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Re: How to get a left to right curve?

Postby bents » Wed Feb 13, 2013 4:27 pm

I personally don't like throwing hyzer flips which go all the way to anhyzer, because I find that much turning to be unpredictable. If I want it to go left to right I usually like releasing flat, or anhyzer with an overstable disc.
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Re: How to get a left to right curve?

Postby PMantle » Wed Feb 13, 2013 4:27 pm

bents wrote:
PMantle wrote:
chunk wrote:turnover, hyzer flip,

How do these differ?


They overlap a lot. Example of a hyzer flip that isn't a turnover shot: Thrown hyzer, and turns to straight for most of its flight, without actually going left to right. This is for things like tunnel shots where you want a long straight shot with little fade.

Example of a turnover shot that's not a hyzer flip: Thrown straight, and turns to an anhyzer angle.

One that is thrown at a hyzer angle and turns around to anhyzer is both a hyzer flip and a turnover shot.

Got it, thanks.
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How to get a left to right curve?

Postby south.texas.dead.i » Wed Feb 13, 2013 5:32 pm

keltik wrote:the shot you are looking for is called a hyzer flip turnover. you need a really flippy disc and some practice. I used to use a beat up X-Avenger for this but the Avenger-SS (ESP or D) can do this out of the box. I also have a TP Northman that is quite flippy in it's new condition. you could also try a roller. RHBH rollers finish to the right.

Well I would try this but the fairway is pretty barrow
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Re: How to get a left to right curve?

Postby keltik » Thu Feb 14, 2013 6:46 am

Narrow fairway is even more reason to throw the hyzer flip.
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How to get a left to right curve?

Postby south.texas.dead.i » Thu Feb 14, 2013 12:20 pm

keltik wrote:Narrow fairway is even more reason to throw the hyzer flip.

Sorry I meant to edit that to say that's why I don't think I could pull off a roller
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Re: How to get a left to right curve?

Postby JHern » Thu Feb 14, 2013 1:28 pm

south.texas.dead.i wrote:I cannot seem to get a disc to have a left to right curve in it for big drives. I am trying to figure out how to throw a disc aiming left of the target about 400' away and having it land in line with the target throwing rhbh?


Flex anhyzer or hyzer flip over will work. A flex is a shot with an over-stable disc that begins to hyzer out the instance it leaves your hand, but if you give it enough anhyzer to begin then it won't come all the way back to flat. The key to this shot is getting it to have the right nose and enough anhyzer through the apex of the flight, and is one of the more difficult shots to master. A hyzer flip over is much easier, just throw under-stable plastic flat or hyzer, and let it turn over. Start with slower discs and work with them until you can handle drivers. I would recommmend the Discraft Glide or Innova Panther to beginners wishing to learn how to shape turn-over lines...also, the kung fu masters of the sport can make a Glide or Panther fly on desired lines out to 400'.

The difference between the flex anhyzer and hyzer flip is that the former will curve right more at the beginning of the flight, while a hyzer flip over will start off going straight (or even slightly left if it has enough hyzer) and then begin to turn right further down the fairway.

south.texas.dead.i wrote:Some people say release it with a nose down angle but wouldn't that just make it go straight into the ground?


Yes if you throw it nose down relative to water level, it will go into the ground. But what they really mean is to throw it flatter (or just a tiny bit nose down) relative to the trajectory you're throwing the disc. So if you're throwing it 3˚ upwards in your release then 3˚ nose up relative to water level is actually thrown flat relative to the trajectory.
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Re: How to get a left to right curve?

Postby kern9787 » Sat Feb 16, 2013 12:00 pm

A lot of this depends on the line you are looking for. In the 400' range, there are two shots I go to if they need to finish to the right. They both vary greatly with regards to the amount of room and the type of line to get there.

The first is the hyzer flip turnover that has been mentioned. Once you get the shot down, and find a disc with a suitable amount of understablity (too much and you'll end up with rollers, too little and you'll never actually track to the right), this shot is golden, and one of the more graceful looking shots you'll pull out. An ideal line for this shot (for me at least) will turn VERY slowly. Note that when I say turn, I mean the actual turning of the disc from hyzer to anhyzer. A significant portion of the flight consists of the disc on a hyzer line, but pushing forward dead straight. The disc should gradually get up to flat (this can be as late as ~75% of the way down the fairway on most of my shots; sometimes later) then gradually begin to turn and track to the right at the end of the flight. It is almost an exact counterpart to a left handed backhand going straight and fading as far as the flight path is concerned.

This shot requires very little height, but doesn't have as much potential for actual movement to the right. Of course, you can add height and power as you get it down to allow for more potential for the disc to move to the right.

The other shot I'll pull out (and possibly one of my favorites to throw) is simply a pure anhyzer. If the hyzer flip turnover shot is a graceful shot, this is its brute force cousin (in reality both shots require similar amounts of power and grace to pull off). An S-PD is typically my go to disc for this, although I'll through several depending on conditions. You want something that will hold a line for you throughout most of the flight, and gradually fade out towards the end. Now when I say fade out, the disc never actually fades back to the left. But it does fade back from a significant anzhyzer in order to finish flat. This shot will require a lot of height (upwards of 30 or 40 ft, depending on the exact line). I'll typically start this shot going off of the left side of the tee pad, usually aiming for an apex that is a little over half way down the fairway. Ideally, the apex should be, obviously your highest point, but also your left most point in the trajectory. This is all assuming your disc doesn't stall out (meaning the disc was too flat at the apex and the nose came up).

From the apex, the disc will travel down and to the right. This is where the amount of fade a disc has is important. Landing this type of shot accurately takes a great deal more precision than landing an equivalent hyzer. If the disc fades too much, it will push back out forward rather than to the right. The good news is that you will likely be throwing some of your longest shots if this happens to you. If the disc doesn't fade enough, you'll end up with the disc rolling. Usually this means a shallow landing roller (meaning its rolling closer to flat and likely won't stand up all the way like a typical roller). This will take the disc straight back to the left. In more extreme cases, the disc will stand up and roll forward. Again, congrats. As you probably threw another of your longest shots in this case. When the disc lands, you want the disc to be flying "straight" and flat. Pending the conditions, usually the disc will slide further to the right. I say straight with quotation marks because it is actually flying as it would had you just thrown a flat and straight shot. Its just moving mostly towards the right.

These shots are considered two of the more advanced shots you'll likely learn, and will take practice to actually make them usable. I'd also like to note that these are the basis for the types of shots you'll see with distance throwers. Obviously with variations placing distance over accuracy made to them.
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