Need Help with Anhyzers

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Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby TwoChain » Sun Nov 03, 2013 11:41 pm

For me the most difficult shot is an anhyzer (even a subtle fade right). My range right now seems to be about a 350 hyzer throw. Of course I'd like to up my distance on that, but a hyzer is my most predictable throw. Distance is a topic for another day. Today I need some real help with a anhyzer throw. I am RHBH and I have had some random success. I have a Glow Avenger SS that seems to hyzer flip to the right. This disc rocks because i have no like it that will just go to the right off a hyzer. But it's all disc and it's very touchy. I'd like to have a better understanding of throwing an anny with other types of discs.

I have a road runner and a bolt that will go right for a bit and come back. I also have a Pro Katan that I have gotten to fly perfectly on a long subtle right fade but then again it goes hard right or hyzers when I dont want it to.

Is it better to use say a Teebird and go for more of a forced anhyzer or use a disc that will hyzer flip?

I was sure my Pro Katan was the disc. But it has become unpredictable lately. I would throw from high to low keeping my wrist at a hyzer angle and it would go deep to the right. Now it seems I can bomb it in an open field on a hyzer. The anhyzer success with it has been lost. I keep going back to this disc because I get tons more distance than a Teebird.

With my road runner seems to either S with a big initial right turn or just fly off right unintended.

My Echo Teebird will fly to the right if I shoot from high to low, maybe because it's beat up? It's good for a mid dog leg right. But what I really want is a long straight to right finish. The closest I have gotten is with the pro katana. I think the valkyrie is a possible candidate for this as well.

So as far as throwing technique. Am I right that high to low throw with a hyzer angle will go right given a katana or beat teebird? I dont like the big sky anny as muc has the ones I've produced using this technique. Also how can I insure a right fade that wont just blast right. Sometimes I compensate and my road runner with just straight up hyzer with no turn at all.

I am just looking for any sorts of tips on high to low and angle of wrist. I am not confidante in my anny at all. I have discs that i know will hyzer where I want easy as pie. But anny is always like a big gamble for me.
RHBH: VP > KC Pro Roc > Echo Teebird > Pro Katana > Echo Wraith
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby itlnstln » Mon Nov 04, 2013 6:58 am

The correct answer, and the one you probably don't want to hear, is it depends. In reality, it's best to have all those shots in your arsenal to handle whatever the course throws at you. A hyzer-flip with an understable disc is great for distance as well as having a disc hold a straight line before it turns to the right later in flight. An S-shot by throwing an overstable disc on an anhyzer line is incredibly useful as well. To more directly answer your question you need to do two things:

1. Practice the technique. Do this with a putter and/or midrange. You can see flaws in your technique better with slower discs. Not only practice throwing on an anhyzer line but practice varying degrees of anhyzer as well.

2. Learn your discs. Once you have the technique down, you need to really understand how each of your discs flies to determine how the disc will react to varying amounts of anhyzer. Understable discs may not take much before they turn-and-burn, so it might be better to hyzer-flip these discs instead. On the other hand, I really like throwing Firebirds on a laser beam with some anhyzer when I want a very straight shot in fairly windy conditions. An overstable disc like a Firebird can fight back from a fair amount of anhyzer giving you some interesting flight patterns that are quite useful. What you will find, too, is that some discs are just flat-out squirrelly and you can't really predict what the disc might do. These discs can make good rollers.

Last, but not least, also consider learning a forehand. Anhyzer shots are great when you have the room or you're otherwise forced to throw that shot, but forehands are more predictable (usually) for the same reasons your backhand hyzer is predictable and you get the added benefit of looking where you're throwing. What you will find, I think, is that as you get better, your disc selection will transition to primarily somewhat overstable discs and your flight path determined by either throwing backhand or forehand with some degree of (an)hyzer.
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby JR » Mon Nov 04, 2013 7:01 am

If you lack fh distance you are left with a hard shot. The easiest way to get a long straight shot with a mild right finish is to hyzer flip a disc. For a more right moving shot the easiest consistent way to anny is to start the disc annied. A flat shot with the disc tilted in the grip is great for small angles. Larger angles see my signature and arching the lower back with the arm dropping in the follow through at the same angle that the arm pull was on. To avoid crashes you need a more hss and lss disc more height or less anny angle or combinations. Assuming no off axis torque. That needs to be eliminated. What the proper disc is depends on your power and cleanliness of form.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby TwoChain » Mon Nov 04, 2013 10:53 am

Good idea, I think I can improve my woods S curves using a more overstable disc. Its too much hit and miss with say my pro katana to depend on it to go right just enough.

I actually just bought a 12 disc bag and plan to use it over my tourny bag. Narrow down my discs! Which you may know is not easy :) "Oh wait, that disc is cool too"

You are right, I suck at forehand. It usual goes to high and to the right. I have never had good distance with my fh. I have no idea how someone can throw 300+ with fh! I should learn.
RHBH: VP > KC Pro Roc > Echo Teebird > Pro Katana > Echo Wraith
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby Mark Ellis » Thu Nov 07, 2013 9:21 am

Anhyzers are the hardest shots in the game to control. Assuming no wind and flat ground there are 4 factors you need to consider in making your disc to flip and glide just right: 1)The stability of your disc, 2) your body position and arm swing angle and 3) the angle of release (wrist /hand position) and 4) the amount of power you put into the shot. Do all 4 things exactly correct and you throw a great anny. :lol:

The most common error I see is in factor #2. The OP mentions high to low arm motion, which is correct. But it is not just High to Low ( release high, follow through low) it also the body position which supports that arm motion. Too many anhyzer failures happen because the golfer is using a hyzer body position while hoping for any anny. A hyzer body position is bending forward at the waist at the point of release. A straight shot body position is standing up straight. An anhyzer body position is bending/arching back at the waist.

If you are bending forward at release the only anhyzer you can master is the hyzer flip with a very understable disc. Not that you can't occasionally throw a competent anny with bad form but the odds are way against you. To consistently control the shot, learn how to arch your back.
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby Wyno » Fri Nov 08, 2013 3:55 pm

Mark Ellis wrote:... it is not just High to Low ( release high, follow through low) it also the body position which supports that arm motion. Too many anhyzer failures happen because the golfer is using a hyzer body position while hoping for any anny. A hyzer body position is bending forward at the waist at the point of release. A straight shot body position is standing up straight. An anhyzer body position is bending/arching back at the waist.

If you are bending forward at release the only anhyzer you can master is the hyzer flip with a very understable disc. Not that you can't occasionally throw a competent anny with bad form but the odds are way against you. To consistently control the shot, learn how to arch your back.


^^ so, so true!
I'd add the snap itself - many players lift the disc slightly (or not so slightly) when they clench their lower arm muscles to maximize snap, I guess this may make it easier to feel the weight of the disc (or think you do). It's not so hard to see that those who have this habit would find it hard to get a good feel for the snap in an anhyzer.
One trick that helped me was thinking about the anhyzer snap as "closing a lock, clockwise" :-)
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby cmlasley » Sat Nov 09, 2013 7:04 am

To add to Mark's list, your run up should generally be from right rear to front left, diagonally across the tee pad.
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby Yig » Sat Nov 09, 2013 8:05 pm

Mark Ellis wrote:Anhyzers are the hardest shots in the game to control. Assuming no wind and flat ground there are 4 factors you need to consider in making your disc to flip and glide just right: 1)The stability of your disc, 2) your body position and arm swing angle and 3) the angle of release (wrist /hand position) and 4) the amount of power you put into the shot. Do all 4 things exactly correct and you throw a great anny. :lol:

The most common error I see is in factor #2. The OP mentions high to low arm motion, which is correct. But it is not just High to Low ( release high, follow through low) it also the body position which supports that arm motion. Too many anhyzer failures happen because the golfer is using a hyzer body position while hoping for any anny. A hyzer body position is bending forward at the waist at the point of release. A straight shot body position is standing up straight. An anhyzer body position is bending/arching back at the waist.

If you are bending forward at release the only anhyzer you can master is the hyzer flip with a very understable disc. Not that you can't occasionally throw a competent anny with bad form but the odds are way against you. To consistently control the shot, learn how to arch your back.


itlnstln wrote:The correct answer, and the one you probably don't want to hear, is it depends. In reality, it's best to have all those shots in your arsenal to handle whatever the course throws at you. A hyzer-flip with an understable disc is great for distance as well as having a disc hold a straight line before it turns to the right later in flight. An S-shot by throwing an overstable disc on an anhyzer line is incredibly useful as well. To more directly answer your question you need to do two things:

1. Practice the technique. Do this with a putter and/or midrange. You can see flaws in your technique better with slower discs. Not only practice throwing on an anhyzer line but practice varying degrees of anhyzer as well.

2. Learn your discs. Once you have the technique down, you need to really understand how each of your discs flies to determine how the disc will react to varying amounts of anhyzer. Understable discs may not take much before they turn-and-burn, so it might be better to hyzer-flip these discs instead. On the other hand, I really like throwing Firebirds on a laser beam with some anhyzer when I want a very straight shot in fairly windy conditions. An overstable disc like a Firebird can fight back from a fair amount of anhyzer giving you some interesting flight patterns that are quite useful. What you will find, too, is that some discs are just flat-out squirrelly and you can't really predict what the disc might do. These discs can make good rollers.

Last, but not least, also consider learning a forehand. Anhyzer shots are great when you have the room or you're otherwise forced to throw that shot, but forehands are more predictable (usually) for the same reasons your backhand hyzer is predictable and you get the added benefit of looking where you're throwing. What you will find, I think, is that as you get better, your disc selection will transition to primarily somewhat overstable discs and your flight path determined by either throwing backhand or forehand with some degree of (an)hyzer.



+1 , what they said. ^^^
Last edited by Yig on Fri Dec 13, 2013 12:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby JHern » Sun Nov 10, 2013 12:05 am

The anhyzer is my best shot. Anhyzers are easier for spin-dominant throwers, since the disc will hold an anhyzer line longer before hyzering out if you are able to put more spin on it. If you don't have a lot of spin, or can't find a way to generate more spin, then you're probably better off working on a good forehand shot, instead.

Spin comes mostly naturally and it is difficult to teach, but I think a shorter compact arm motion with a lot of whip and a good pinch pivot are key elements that can be developed. The disc should basically be propelled by the opening of your wrist and pivot all the way around your pinch point (index-thumb) before coming off your hand. Many discs will fly cleaner, and sometimes farther, as a result. They will also hold the line you put on them at release.

If I were you, I would work with a Buzzz, and deliberately try to spin it more out of your hands at the release. See how long you can keep it on any line before it begins to hyzer out. It has thinner rim, which I think provides a better release and grip for this kind of throw. Also, you will not be relying on the disc to turn over for you so much, but rather learning to put it on an anhyzer line at release, and keep it on that line down the fairway.
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby JR » Mon Nov 11, 2013 3:28 am

While more spin helps it does not have to be that strict in many cases. The lower the throw and the speed and lss are the less thedisc is gonna fade out. Especially if you have way more speed than the disc is designed for. A 300' thrower can easily keep straight mids annied to the ground with medium height tight annies that start out with plenty of anny angle or flip to a sterp angle. You need less distance than that for straight driving putters.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby Yig » Mon Nov 11, 2013 12:15 pm

JR wrote: The lower the throw and the speed and lss are the less the disc is gonna fade out. Especially if you have way more speed than the disc is designed for.

This seems contradictory to me. In my experience it seems the slower I throw a disc, the more fade it has. If I throw really hard (perhaps too much speed ?) , the disc will anhyzer and never fade back.

What do you mean by "lss" ?
Last edited by Yig on Fri Dec 13, 2013 12:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby seabas22 » Mon Nov 11, 2013 1:41 pm

Lower disc speed rating, not talking about the actual speed the disc is traveling, ie don't throw high speed discs for anhyzers. LSS is low speed stability of the disc or it's tendency to fade late.
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby Yig » Mon Nov 11, 2013 3:18 pm

seabas22 wrote:Lower disc speed rating, not talking about the actual speed the disc is traveling, ie don't throw high speed discs for anhyzers. LSS is low speed stability of the disc or it's tendency to fade late.



Thanks. That clears it up !
Last edited by Yig on Fri Dec 13, 2013 12:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby JHern » Wed Nov 13, 2013 8:21 am

JR wrote:While more spin helps it does not have to be that strict in many cases. The lower the throw and the speed and lss are the less thedisc is gonna fade out. Especially if you have way more speed than the disc is designed for. A 300' thrower can easily keep straight mids annied to the ground with medium height tight annies that start out with plenty of anny angle or flip to a sterp angle. You need less distance than that for straight driving putters.


I think this is a crutch, and it is exactly what the OP was complaining about, using an under-stable disc is simple unreliable. Get a stable/straight disc and get it to hold an anhyzer line off the fingers, that's the best way. Otherwise you're always fiddling with turning over the disc a certain amount...it's fun when it works, but easy to show that it's a low probability shot golf-wise. Good whip/snap/spin, that's the better path forward for anyone.
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Re: Need Help with Anhyzers

Postby JR » Wed Nov 13, 2013 5:03 pm

What i described above applies to straight mids and speed ten Beasts easily when powered enough. Mids like Buzzes and Rocs need only about 250' driver power to anny to the ground given properly low height enough anny. With multiple anny lines available not just large annies. No flippy discs needed. However it is nice to rip a flat shot and get just a little anny for tight fairways if you are not happy about manipulating flight by tilting the disc in the grip. Which eliminates the need for those discs if you have straight discs. So i would not call anyyhing a crutch.

Any shot needs the skill to pull it off with the given disc and a non flipping needs to be thrown just as correctlyvas a flipping disc. Flipping needs simultaneous prper patts to a throw in more ways than an annied straight disc to get going in the right direction. Power requirement is less for a flipping disc so what is the safest shot depends on the player. Not everyone can bomb a Firebird annied. Mileages vary but a skilled hyzer flip can fly straighter although some new straight discs have bridged the straight finish gap nicely.

Flips are the best shots bh for holes that are on the tighter side and start straight turning a little right later so i do call flips as important as any other shots so i disagree about the use of flips. They are as golfable shots as anything given the right circumstances. With a skilled player and the proper disc.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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