Have a question about the different types of release

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Have a question about the different types of release

Postby rll131 » Tue Nov 12, 2013 7:07 pm

I've only been playing for two months and just figured out a few rounds ago from YouTube that I don't let go of the disc but to let it rip out. My question is with midrange shots and approaches sometimes the disc sticks to my fingers and just nails the ground in front of me. Am I suppose to let go on mid range shots and approaches let's say 150 ft to 50ft or do I just need to grip easier on shorter shots so it rips out smooth like on drives.
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Re: Have a question about the different types of release

Postby aDave » Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:04 pm

YMMV. All of these are RHBH shots btw...
I switch up my grip depending on the distance and or "touch" ( usually nose angle ), of the shot.
100-200 ft shots I usually throw an mid 160 gram R-Pro Aviar PnA with a "birdie grip" this consists of a looser power grip with the middle finger off the rim, resting on the flight plate and pointed inwards toward the middle of the disc. In this shot, I will let the disc pull (rip) out of my hand. Messing around with the pressure applied by the ring and pinkie fingers to the inside of the rim as well as shortening your reach back ( among 100 other factors ) will help you learn to range it. There is a whole lot to work on here. If you ever want to get really good at this sport, don't neglect this range!

Under 100 to just outside of the circle, I switch up to a full on fan grip on the Aviar. I don't even have the pad of my index finger on the inner rim.
Instead I create a fulcrum with the rim of the disc pinched between the pad of my thumb and the finger joint at the end of my index finger.
The pad of my index finger hangs over the rim a bit, but never really applies any force to the inside of the rim. I try to get it to feel like a hinge that the disc pivots on.
The rest of my fingers are supporting the flight plate only. The throwing motion for this shot consists of a very short, slowly accelerating elbow extension toward the target that stops abruptly, followed by uncoiling my wrist and "popping" the disc off of the palm of my hand, forcing it to pivot around the fulcrum. Sometimes I pull it around my body, sometimes I push it out from my belly. Sometimes I'll use a Ryno if I need it to flex back more than nose up will allow for. It depends on the line. I actively release this shot, which means timing is super critical. When practicing it I mainly focus on the feel of the disc pivoting around my first finger and thumb fulcrum. I don't know for sure but I think that lots of folks call this a touch shot. I've drained a good many impossible seeming 50-70 foot anny putts with it, so I think it's worth a look. Works well with a Rattler or Whittler as well( probably any lightish lid really).

Inside the circle, I "spush" meaning that I've got the stance, weight shift and arm motion of a push putter with a good bit of spin added by my wrist right at the end. This consists of something similar to the 100-to the circle shot described above, but with the arm straight ( no elbow flex!), moving from ground up rather than parallel to it. In this shot I am actively opening my hand so that the disc leaves clean and flat, with no wobble. There's no fulcrum generating spin, just the wrist unloading and pop.

I've recently been developing a forehand anny touch shot, but I'm so inconsistent with it, it would be a waste of time trying to describe it.
Work on that too.
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Re: Have a question about the different types of release

Postby Yig » Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:48 pm

rll131 wrote:I've only been playing for two months and just figured out a few rounds ago from YouTube that I don't let go of the disc but to let it rip out. My question is with midrange shots and approaches sometimes the disc sticks to my fingers and just nails the ground in front of me. Am I suppose to let go on mid range shots and approaches let's say 150 ft to 50ft or do I just need to grip easier on shorter shots so it rips out smooth like on drives.


Which Youtube video ?

I always let go of the disc. If I didn't, it would just be in my hand and I would look like a goof.

Occasionally I hold on to the disc too long (RHBH) and release the disc way too late/to the right. I guess I don't understand how the disc could just "rip out of my hand".


That said , I definitely use a firmer grip for my drive than ANY other time I throw. Drives I hold all fingers fairly tightly under the rim. Putts and short approaches I place my index finger on the rim/edge of the disc,middle finger towards the middle of the disc , ring finger just behind the middle, and pinky finger resting on the inside edge of the rim.

I don't know if this is the "correct" method or not , but that's how I do it for short approach shots and putts.
Last edited by Yig on Fri Dec 13, 2013 12:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Have a question about the different types of release

Postby rll131 » Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:58 pm

aDave wrote:YMMV. All of these are RHBH shots btw...
I switch up my grip depending on the distance and or "touch" ( usually nose angle ), of the shot.
100-200 ft shots I usually throw an mid 160 gram R-Pro Aviar PnA with a "birdie grip" this consists of a looser power grip with the middle finger off the rim, resting on the flight plate and pointed inwards toward the middle of the disc. In this shot, I will let the disc pull (rip) out of my hand. Messing around with the pressure applied by the ring and pinkie fingers to the inside of the rim as well as shortening your reach back ( among 100 other factors ) will help you learn to range it. There is a whole lot to work on here. If you ever want to get really good at this sport, don't neglect this range!

Under 100 to just outside of the circle, I switch up to a full on fan grip on the Aviar. I don't even have the pad of my index finger on the inner rim.
Instead I create a fulcrum with the rim of the disc pinched between the pad of my thumb and the finger joint at the end of my index finger.
The pad of my index finger hangs over the rim a bit, but never really applies any force to the inside of the rim. I try to get it to feel like a hinge that the disc pivots on.
The rest of my fingers are supporting the flight plate only. The throwing motion for this shot consists of a very short, slowly accelerating elbow extension toward the target that stops abruptly, followed by uncoiling my wrist and "popping" the disc off of the palm of my hand, forcing it to pivot around the fulcrum. Sometimes I pull it around my body, sometimes I push it out from my belly. Sometimes I'll use a Ryno if I need it to flex back more than nose up will allow for. It depends on the line. I actively release this shot, which means timing is super critical. When practicing it I mainly focus on the feel of the disc pivoting around my first finger and thumb fulcrum. I don't know for sure but I think that lots of folks call this a touch shot. I've drained a good many impossible seeming 50-70 foot anny putts with it, so I think it's worth a look. Works well with a Rattler or Whittler as well( probably any lightish lid really).

Inside the circle, I "spush" meaning that I've got the stance, weight shift and arm motion of a push putter with a good bit of spin added by my wrist right at the end. This consists of something similar to the 100-to the circle shot described above, but with the arm straight ( no elbow flex!), moving from ground up rather than parallel to it. In this shot I am actively opening my hand so that the disc leaves clean and flat, with no wobble. There's no fulcrum generating spin, just the wrist unloading and pop.

I've recently been developing a forehand anny touch shot, but I'm so inconsistent with it, it would be a waste of time trying to describe it.
Work on that too.



Man really appreciate the detailed response. I was thinking that's what most people would do is just loosen it up a bit on 100-200 ft shots. I already keep my hand loose on the pull back and tighten my grip right before release. I'll have to try out your technique from 50-100 ft but from 30 txt in I really like the push putt.
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Re: Have a question about the different types of release

Postby rll131 » Tue Nov 12, 2013 10:01 pm

Yig wrote:
rll131 wrote:I've only been playing for two months and just figured out a few rounds ago from YouTube that I don't let go of the disc but to let it rip out. My question is with midrange shots and approaches sometimes the disc sticks to my fingers and just nails the ground in front of me. Am I suppose to let go on mid range shots and approaches let's say 150 ft to 50ft or do I just need to grip easier on shorter shots so it rips out smooth like on drives.


Which Youtube video ?

I always let go of the disc. If I didn't, it would just be in my hand and I would look like a goof.

Occasionally I hold on to the disc too long (RHBH) and release the disc way too late/to the right. I guess I don't understand how the disc could just "rip out of my hand".


That said , I definitely use a firmer grip for my drive than ANY other time I throw. Drives I hold all fingers fairly tightly under the rim. Putts and short approaches I place my index finger on the rim/edge of the disc,middle finger towards the middle of the disc , ring finger just behind the middle, and pinky finger resting on the inside edge of the rim.

I don't know if this is the "correct" method or not , but that's how I do it for short approach shots and putts.


.......................Blake



I forget exactly which video but if you look up driving tips or something you'll find it. I'm telling you if your letting your disc go instead of letting it rip out of your hand your loosing a ton of distance and spin I'm a beginner and went from throwing a Vulcan maybe 300ft to now around 375 and mid ranges around 300. Give it a try also helps a lot being consistent with aim.
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Re: Have a question about the different types of release

Postby Yig » Tue Nov 12, 2013 10:10 pm

Last edited by Yig on Fri Dec 13, 2013 12:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Have a question about the different types of release

Postby Yig » Tue Nov 12, 2013 10:42 pm

I think I found it. He uses the term "rip" several times.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... Mjxqe7GVIQ

These were interesting to watch too. Guess I have some new stuff to try tomorrow morning !

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-5uHMoYJ6Q

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xa8QHevIGKs
Last edited by Yig on Fri Dec 13, 2013 12:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Have a question about the different types of release

Postby itlnstln » Wed Nov 13, 2013 8:28 am

On drives and long approaches (or any shot that requires a forceful throw), you do not let go of the disc. The disc, if even reasonably well thrown, should rip itself from your grip (assuming BH shots; FH works similarly, though). Shorter shots, like up shots, require a bit more "touch" and may lend themselves better to letting go of the disc or just a softer rip from a modified grip. In either case, if you're letting go of a drive, you're missing out on the main opportunity of leveraging angular momentum on the disc. In fact, not only should you not be letting go of the disc, you should be squeezing your hardest right at the hit (where the disc actually leaves your hand).
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Re: Have a question about the different types of release

Postby JR » Wed Nov 13, 2013 4:43 pm

The only throw that i try to open my hand and straighten the fingers fof a release is a putt. Mind you i putt out to a fairly long distance often so it covers much of what others would call approaches.

Mids of the straight overstable and the easy to rip cleanly out of the grip should always be ripping out.

I assume that Blake with his light discs does not create enough speed to make the rip obvious to feel. Heavy discs have more gyroscopics and pull harder out of the hand when you have enough speed. But those lacking 300' power have a much harder time noticing the ripping sensation. So for a power deficient thrower the only chance of pivoting the disc enough to make it easier to feel is to throw a disc faster meaning a light disc. Very opposite to a power thrower. I was at 300' with drivers when i began to notice the feel of the rip.

The longer the throw and faster the disc class the more grip power is required. Putts and approaches can be very soft indeed but drives leave most hands and fingers lacking in squeezing strength vs what is needed.

Pulling to the right is often caused by starting the arm pull before the lst step of the x step lands. Pulling short to the ground sounds like off axis torque. Wrist rolling clockwise or the shoulder socket or the arm drops lower in the follow through or the disc scrapes along the index finger or sticks to some finger usually at the tip. Beadless thinner putters are the easiest to release or rip cleanlyvfor those with moderate to small hands and fingers. Before switching discs i would try to change the grip to a one with fewer fingers inside the disc. Or aligning the fingers inside the disc more vertically for a flat shot.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Have a question about the different types of release

Postby rll131 » Thu Nov 14, 2013 7:14 pm

I feel the rip on some shots and others I completely miss it and I know it. I grip locked two holes yesterday and shot the disc straight behind me lol. If I'm trying to drive 350+ am I suppose to grip the disc as hard as I can win all 4 fingers and thumb or just the thumb and pointer. Also Im bringing the disc back with a relatively loose grip and trying to tighten my grip right as my hand passes my body and starts to go out from my body. Is this the right way or am I suppose to just grip tight right at the release?
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Re: Have a question about the different types of release

Postby JR » Fri Nov 15, 2013 1:22 am

Loose in the beginning to keep the arm muscles loose and quicker moving tightening late. When depends on the person. How fast their arm moves, other body parts too, nervous system quickness etc. The number of fingers in the grip depends on what you need. In the summer without sweaty fingers it is easy to hold on to the disc with only two fingers under the disc for a half hit. Meaning you can get to beyond 400' without the disc pivoting fully. Which needs immensely more power. the tighter te fingers on the side of the pinky are the more likely it is that one or more of those fingers will stick to the disc for a while causing the disc to flip. Or flutter at least. Annies need more grip power than other shots. Rollers should be annies. Normally only drives need four fingers on the rim and not always. Meaning not going for 430'+. It is normally not a distance that i could reach but when i do it is a two finger throw and in optimal conditions with even more reduced pinch power thanks to placing the lowest part of the disc into the outermost joints of the middle and index finger. If one can hold on to the disc that way the disc accelerates and spins more late in the throw for a few feet more distance.

Grip power requirements at under maximum distance throws often are masked by improper use of the thumb. Mine suffers from nerve damage elsewhere so my experiences need to be taken with lots of salt considering i have been altered surgically in throwing arm physiology. Because i am thumb power deficient i have futzed around with it and it is crucial for preventing the disc from popping up from the fingers that are under the disc. Grip is as strong as the weakest component and the thumb faces more fingers alone so the thumb is the great limiter of grip strength. And the index finger the second important finger. If you move the thumb away from the rim to even more centered than the rim to flight plate intersection the thumb can keep the disc in between the finger tips and the palm on the underside of the disc. It makes pushing the front of the disc down a little harder though. There are plenty of trick to pushing the front of the disc down so that is a reasonable compromise once it is dealt with.
Flat shots need running on the center line of the tee and planting each step on the center line. Anhyzer needs running from rear right to front left with the plant step hitting the ground to the left of the line you're running on. Hyzer is the mirror of that.
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Re: Have a question about the different types of release

Postby Dan-O » Sun Nov 24, 2013 9:11 pm

Paul McBeth said he lets go of shots less than 300'. He also throws about 500'. So for us mortals, I'm guessing anything less than 200' should be let go of.
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Re: Have a question about the different types of release

Postby Star Shark » Sun Nov 24, 2013 11:07 pm

If you're griplocking, I'd bet it's that the disc is coming out on time, but your shoulder turn is happening early. As most players hit that plateau, one thing that doesn't occur to them is that this is when you insert that pause in the shoulder turn that we've discussed here. So the shoulders turn before the rip causing a big pull oe griplock. With that pause, the shouldets are properly in synch with every thing else and you get your big rip properly on line.
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