Teebird TL

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Teebird TL

Postby Bradley Walker » Fri Apr 07, 2006 5:10 pm

Following the advice of Blake, I have neen revisting the Teebird.

I have two 165 gram T-Birds, on CE on Star. I like the CE best. I had tow DX they were even better, but did not stay the same after some abuse.

Throwing with a left to right down snap results in a flat bullet that behaves.

OK. So why not try the Teebird TL for a totally flat release at mid speed?

Why doesn't Innova campaign the the "L" (meaning less stable) discs more?

The plastic is getting better, and more dense, maing everything more stable and more likely to gyroscopically prescess at the the slow portion of the flight. IS the answer to go a little less stable?
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Postby Solty » Fri Apr 07, 2006 9:35 pm

i believe the L stands for Longer....and longer usually results from discs being able to work the S curve..

just my 2 cents
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Postby didihitatree » Fri Apr 07, 2006 10:07 pm

The L stands for "less overstable."
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Postby bigs348 » Mon Apr 10, 2006 9:45 am

Innvoa touts the "L" as meaning both "longer" and "less overstable." Here is the blurb on the TL from their site:

"About the TL
The TL is the brother of the reliable TeeBird. The “L” stands for “Less Overstable” and “Longer”. This disc has the same great speed and glide as the TeeBird, but is straighter flying with less fade at the end of the flight. If you are looking for a straight flying maximum fairway driver in Pro-line Plastic, the TL is the answer."

I throw Teebird-L's like none other and they are my absolute favorite. I have a 171g CFR Glow that is more overstable and I throw it at about 75% power with a slight bit of hyzer and it flips up flat, goes forever, and then has a predictable fade at the end.

I also have two Star TLs at 171 and 172 and these are great as well. (I tried a Star Teebird, but wayyy too overstable). These are really nice S curve discs when thrown with some power, but I find that in the woods I can throw them at 70% and they'll fly dead straight with very, very little fade. If you throw them low enough, they will skip a bit straight and not fade at all. I like Teebirds, but for a fairway driver they were a little too overstable for me and the TL is a great substitute (or beat up a DX Teebird and it will essentially be the same thing). For open fields, the Star TLs work good, too, just thrown with some hyzer. They will flip up and give a long S-curve with some pretty damn good distance. I reserve the huge distance open field shots for my Wraith, but if a hole is in the 350-375 range, I'll pull out the TL.

Pro Teebird-Ls are less stable than either Star or CFR and I find them best for long anhyzers, really tight woods where you can throw at 50% and they'll go straight, and for rolling when they get beat up. For a fairway driver, I think TLs are the best combination of straight flight and distance. Not recommend for headwinds however. They fly well in tailwinds though.
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Postby Bradley Walker » Mon Apr 10, 2006 11:01 am

bigs348 wrote:
I throw Teebird-L's like none other and they are my absolute favorite. I have a 171g CFR Glow that is more overstable and I throw it at about 75% power with a slight bit of hyzer and it flips up flat, goes forever, and then has a predictable fade at the end.

I also have two Star TLs at 171 and 172 and these are great as well. (I tried a Star Teebird, but wayyy too overstable). These are really nice S curve discs when thrown with some power, but I find that in the woods I can throw them at 70% and they'll fly dead straight with very, very little fade. If you throw them low enough, they will skip a bit straight and not fade at all. I like Teebirds, but for a fairway driver they were a little too overstable for me and the TL is a great substitute (or beat up a DX Teebird and it will essentially be the same thing). For open fields, the Star TLs work good, too, just thrown with some hyzer. They will flip up and give a long S-curve with some pretty damn good distance. I reserve the huge distance open field shots for my Wraith, but if a hole is in the 350-375 range, I'll pull out the TL.

Pro Teebird-Ls are less stable than either Star or CFR and I find them best for long anhyzers, really tight woods where you can throw at 50% and they'll go straight, and for rolling when they get beat up. For a fairway driver, I think TLs are the best combination of straight flight and distance. Not recommend for headwinds however. They fly well in tailwinds though.


I bought a Pro TL this weekend.

This is the type of disc I will be gravitating towards. The TL is much "easier" to throw for me, and appears to be much more flexible. It is good lower speed shots or you can just crank it. I can throw this disc "flat" as apposed to need to use the anheyser snap that I need to throw the Wraith, Orc, CE Teebird, Eagle, Star Beast, etc. I think the TL is a more "realistic" design for less than Pro level players.

The TL I throw more like a super fast Roc. Just throw with a flat release, add I little heyser into the wind. The harder you throw it, add a little more heyser. This is more "old school" for me, and makes more sense.

If you look at the wing of the TL, you will see more of a symmetrical airfoil. This is similar to the new Beast (which I like BTW). I think these style disc wings "behave" much better, and more linear, and more "old school". Like a Roc, for example.

If you throw a ROC, you can throw it flat, and it will fly flat, and die just a tick to the left at the end. If you throw a Roc into the wind, you will need some heyser to compensate for the added relative air speed of the disc. If you crank a Roc, you would heyser flip it a bit. This was how "old school" discs worked. for anything less than very windy conditions, this is easily managed.

Long story short, I like the TL, a lot. I hope my newest 163 CE Beast will be close the flight of the TL, the 168 Star Beast is still too overstable for anything less than a very hard level snap.

If I had to throw every driver I had away today, and keep ONLY one . It would be the TL.
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Postby Blake_T » Mon Apr 10, 2006 1:26 pm

the TL was acutally the main pro driver from 1999-2002.

the star flies pretty well imo, better than the pro, but neither quite as well as the old SE TL's.

as for what you are noticing about snap requirements on the TL vs. Beast, it is due to speed. the beast is faster and will need more on it to hold a line.
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Postby rodman » Mon Apr 10, 2006 2:45 pm

I'd agree on the TL. I was starting to fall in love with the roadrunner but the TL always makes it into my hand when i need a longish straight shot. Love it.
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Postby bigs348 » Sat May 13, 2006 1:23 am

So I hit the field this evening with my bag, and fell in love again with my TLs. I've been playing mostly wooded courses recently and throwing Buzzzes and Aviars on almost everything, so I haven't had any real chances to throw drivers. That's why field practice is so great...

I love my CFR Glo TL for long turnovers and low ceiling hyzer flips, and my regular CFR TL is a great overstable driver (good in winds up to 25mph or so, flies like a DX Teebird).

But my Star TLs...man, these are just money. I was just barely coming up short of my Wraith distance, and I'm really thinking my Wraiths are almost useless. I can use them for huge open shots where I don't need the control, but for any kind of golf D distance shot I can just as easily throw my TL and be more confident in its flight. For a speed 7 fairway driver in premium plastic, these really, really bomb (but with so much more control).

I busted out my beat Pro TL, too, and a newish Pro TL that I'd flexed a bit, and threw a bunch of rollers. This was a little frustrating because no matter how much angle I had on them, they stood up really fast and died off early, but I'm thinking it may just have been because the grass was long. I didn't have my standards (Star Sidewinder and CE Leopard) with me to compare though.

When reading this site, I've thought many times about switching over to DX Teebirds or D-Cyclones and trying my hand at some base plastic classics, but everytime I throw my TLs I remember why I started throwing them in the first place... :D
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Postby Blake_T » Sat May 13, 2006 3:12 am

I busted out my beat Pro TL, too, and a newish Pro TL that I'd flexed a bit, and threw a bunch of rollers. This was a little frustrating because no matter how much angle I had on them, they stood up really fast and died off early, but I'm thinking it may just have been because the grass was long. I didn't have my standards (Star Sidewinder and CE Leopard) with me to compare though.


sounds like you were landing them too close to the tee as well.

speed is what turns them topside. the slower they are when they land, the less apt they are to tail.
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Postby bigs348 » Sat May 13, 2006 5:50 am

I was getting them out 225-250 before they hit, but I was throwing on a much lower line than I usually do so when they hit they were still really moving.

I can throw controlled rollers, but for distance I've yet to figure out how much distance to get in the air and how much height to have under them.
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