the perfect beginner bag

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Postby asimo » Sun Jul 31, 2005 12:15 am

I went out and played a round with the Ace and the Tbird(144g). I was driving with both discs on every hole. I noticed that I had a lot easier time throwing the Ace and making it go straight. With both discs I was torqueing some drives out to the right but much more with the Tbird. A couple of my throws with the Ace were atleast 275' and dead straight, I knew because I was just 20-30 feet short of a 309' marker. I also had a couple of giagantic throws with the Tbird but all of them landed well right of the fairway. So, I am thinking maybe I should keep throwing the Tbird until I can make it go straight or even fade left. Is that a good plan or is it just too light? :roll:
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Postby Blake_T » Mon Aug 01, 2005 12:37 pm

imo, you should "have the ability" to throw the teebird straight if you wanted to. teebirds are pretty stable, so it is likely it was torque if they were turning very hard without being over 300'.

learning how to do something you couldn't before will ALWAYS benefit your game and understanding of throwing.
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Postby asimo » Mon Aug 01, 2005 2:20 pm

I will keep working on throwing the 144g dx Tbird and let you know how that goes...
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Postby mothrows » Tue Aug 02, 2005 10:13 pm

Blake when you wrote about a person needing to throw a drone instead of a roc for a midrange that fit me perfectly. I have an mrv that I have never been able to throw because, I always turn it over. Clearly it's my technique, but I don't know where all the turn and flutter is coming from. By the way, your previous advice about my standing throw vs. x step d problems were a great help. Thanks for your time and thoughtful replies.
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Postby Blake_T » Wed Aug 03, 2005 12:40 pm

that problem is off-axis torque, generally caused by an abrupt change in direction of your throwing motion before, at, or immediately after the rip. general principle is that the disc is on a plane, and it's motion is a vector. a force applied that is not parallel to the vector or plane will fight against the disc. a high follow through is one of the quick fixes to this problem.
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Postby asimo » Thu Aug 11, 2005 10:32 am

Ok, the Tbird 144g is very tempramental. I seem to able to throw it way left or way right but not right down the middle. I am still working with it in a practice feild and I think it's a good tool for me to use in my learning. The idea is, once I'm throwing it flat I will have great controll.

I also picked up a DX Leopard 165g. I have been using it as my main driver on the course. I still have to be careful to not pull it right or left but it is much more forgiving then the super light Tbird. I feel like I am making strides in both distance and accuracy everytime I play. consistently hitting 300' is right around the corner.

How will I know when it's time to switch drivers? What should my next driver be?

Thanks for all the wonderful help I have gotten from this board,
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Postby Blake_T » Thu Aug 11, 2005 12:57 pm

150 class discs are always more tempramental as they really fly how you throw them. sounds like you have a lot of left/right noise in your throw if that is what is happening.

basically, it's not a disc you will probably ever master or need to as it's generally more difficult to use discs that require 100% execution.

your next step will be to take on discs that are more stable rather than purely faster. you have really hit the next plateau once you outgrow the leopard.

imo, i generally push stable discs with overstable finishes:
d cyclone, dx gazelle, polaris ls, x xl dx eagle, dx teebird, jls.

the step up from that get faster and flippier... and this is the last era before the super high speed drivers:
dx valkyrie, x xs,
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Postby asimo » Thu Aug 11, 2005 2:24 pm

Let me see if I understand what you are saying...

*I probably have a lot of left to right noise in my throw.
*There is no need to keep practicing with my 144g Tbird as it would require perfect form to throw correctly.
*I should keep throwing the Leopard until I reach a distance plateau.
*My next driver should be something along the lines of a Tbird or JLS. After mastering those discs I would move on to something like a Valkery and only, after mastering that, would I finally move on to the fastest of todays discs.

What can I do about "left to right noise" in my throw? About what distance do you think I will be throwing when I start plateauing with the Leopard? How do you know when you have really out grown a disc(I know I am not even close right now)?

ty,
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Postby Blake_T » Thu Aug 11, 2005 8:46 pm

left/right noise = your throw is not in a linear pull and the result is you have error tendencies to let the disc slip/push early or grip/pull late.

correct on the 150 class teebird.

as for the leopard, i personally would move away with it once you can really control it and then focus on throwing discs with a more predictable finish. the gazelle, cyclone, and polaris are basically the same speed as the leopard.

as for next driver, you will find out preferences in the meantime. the jls, xl, and teebird are not forgiving discs if you get them flipped over sufficiently. imo, it is a lot easier to consistently throw an eagle, gazelle, cyclone, etc. as they are much more forgiving.

you could honestly move to the valk right now probably, but imo, you should get a feel for what traditional styled discs do. nowadays design uses speed to suppliment stability. older discs were stable/understable by nature.

out of the discs i listed, the XS, XL, teebird, and Valk are the longest and the eagle and jls have "enough" d... however, you will likely want a disc that will fly near max D at a low trajectory. imo, you can feel free to step up whenever you want to discs like the beast, flash, wildcat, orc, etc., but you should have the foundation of the game already there vs. building your foundation upon those discs.
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Postby samyouknowwho » Mon Sep 19, 2005 6:33 pm

exactly how long does it take to get approved on the pdga site. its been about 3 days now and Im still not accepted.
i wonder where my driver is
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Postby Blake_T » Mon Sep 19, 2005 9:04 pm

should take less than 5 minutes...
maybe your email filtered out the confirmation as spam?
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Postby TexasOutlaw » Fri Dec 09, 2005 10:29 am

Blake_T wrote:btw, don't listen to most of the pdga board advice. there was a time when it was good, now it isn't.


They have some good advice. They over do their advertisements. I bet when you posted this on their site you got answers like, "INNOVA! or Gateway!" without actually getting an answer.
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