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Disc Review



Backhand Driving Problems

Backhand Drives
All of my drives end up to the right.
  • The disc flutters and dives to the right.
  • The disc sticks on my hand and I release it to the right.
  • The course I play is very windy and I often end up to the right.
  • All of my throws have a slight anhyzer and I can't fix it.
  • My technique is fine but it still goes right, could it be the disc?
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    Backhand Drives
    The disc flutters and dives to the right.

    Disc flutter is caused by too much disc speed and not enough spin. Each disc has a specific amount of spin required for each speed to fly straight. If the disc flutters it will have more understable flight characteristics.

    Possible Causes
  • Your grip doesn't give a clean release.
  • You are overpowering the disc.


    Your grip doesn't give a clean release.
    Possible Fix:
    A firm grip is necessary to get good snap and keep the disc on line, while a clean grip is necessary for the disc to leave your hand with enough spin and on a clean plane. If your grip is too tight or too loose it may start to cause problems. A firm grip will force the disc to "rip" out of your hand and with enough speed will enough an audible snap as one or more of your fingers will slap against your palm when the disc leaves. There is no general consensus on what is the "best" grip as all discs have different rim shapes and people have different sized hands. A few things that are consensus amongst most pros.
    1. All 4 fingers should be on the rim or under the flight plate.
    2. Your thumb should be pressed firm on top, pinching the disc between it and 1 or more fingers.

    I know that not everyone will find all grips comfortable and if you have success with a grip that does not have all 4 fingers on the rim, but if you are having problems with disc flutter, you may want to consider trying a change of grip.


    You are overpowering the disc.
    Possible Fix:
    Flutter caused by too much speed and not enough spin is quite common, especially with midrange discs and sidearm throws. A common misconception is that you want your arm and the disc to be moving as fast as possible to get maximum distance. The truth of the situation is that Force = Mass x Acceleration and while you want the disc to be moving fairly quickly, it is more important that you are putting as much acceleration on the disc as possible as opposed to raw speed. This means that although it might feel that you are getting more on the disc if you are muscling it with your arm, you can get more force by having a quick, fluid motion that uses your shoulders to whip your arm through for more acceleration and more spin.

    Try easing up a bit on the power if you are having this problem. That doesn't mean to weenie arm it, you still want a firm throw, but think about where your power is coming from. If you are turning over discs you shouldn't work more on quickness and finesse with a firm grip rather than trying to strong-arm it. Also keep in mind that slower discs will be easier to overpower so you may have to hold back even more with your understable discs as well as midranges and putters. If your discs are very understable, you might be ready for more overstable discs but remember that there are pros out there that can throw Aviars 400' without turning them over due to their quickness and fluid technique.

    The problem is something else.
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    Backhand Drives

    The disc sticks on my hand and I release it to the right.
    This problem, also known as "grip-lock," can be a frustrating one to diagnose the cause.

    Possible Causes
  • You are gripping the disc too tight.
  • Your timing between the footwork and pull-through are off.
  • You are rolling your wrist over during release.
  • You are easing up too much on your throws.
  • This only happens with certain discs.
  • Your pinky isn't leaving the disc cleanly upon release.


    Your are gripping the disc too tight.
    Possible Fix:
    If you feel like you are gripping the disc as tightly as possible, try loosening up a little bit. A grip should be firm but if it makes your finger tips turn purple, it's probably a little too much.


    Your timing between the footwork and pull-through are off.
    Possible Fix:
    Timing is very critical to a powerful and accurate throw. Fractions of a second count and these are probably the toughest issues to spot unles your timing is way off. A fluid, well-balanced x-step is necessary. If you are trying to step too fast or too slow, or your steps are too long or too short, it will be impossible to keep your desired disc orientation, release point/angle, and timing.

    Throws that grip-lock are often due to an early pull-through. Starting your shoulder rotation and pull through before your plant foot has landed is almost certain to end up grip locking. The rhythm of the throw should flow 1-2-plant-whip. A 1-2-whip/plant or 1-2-whip-plant is going to cause a very bad griplock/anhyzer problem. If you are finding your throws ending up way right you may want to focus on this. If you find yourself pulling early you may have found your culprit. This problem will take a bit of work to fix but be persistant with it and focus on your timing until it becomes automatic. Be very careful that you do not over compensate. Throws that end noticably left are generally due to a late weight transfer and/or late rotation of the shoulders.


    You are rolling your wrist over during release.
    Possible Fix:
    Wrist roll is your tendency to turn your wrist/forearm during or immediately after release. This usually happens when your arm is moving very fast so it might be a tough one to spot. If you go through your motion in slow-motion, open your hand like you are going to shake hands with someone. On a release with no wrist roll your palm should be facing somewhat towards you. This is ideal for a line drive shot. If your palm is facing up, you are rolling your wrist over. The result of this is that discs are more likely to turn over and may cause anhyzer tendency. The timing and magnitude of the roll will effect the flight and severe early wrist rolls can lead to grip lock or unintentional rollers. Wrist roll over is often used on a throw like a roll curve, but it won't work as well for a straight throw. On the other end of things, rolling the wrist too far under is shown with the palm facing down. This will expose the flight plate and give a very hard hyzer.


    You are easing up too much on your throws
    Possible Fix:
    A common problem that occurs during rounds, especially on tighter holes, is throwing with less power than your normal throw. It takes a certain amount of snap for the disc to properly rip out of your hand. If you play and/or practice regularly, your body angles will generally gravitate towards releasing the disc online while throwing with a certain amount of power. A less powerful throw will have less momentum to force the disc out of your hand at the usual time and the result will be throws that release late. This does not mean that you should throw as hard as you can all the time. What this does mean is that all your throws should be firm at the point of release in order to make sure the disc leaves your hand in the direction you want it to and are accustomed to.


    This only happens with certain discs.
    Possible Fix:
    Discs vary with rim shapes, widths, and depths. Player's hand sizes vary from person to person. Players with smaller hands are going to have more trouble with griplocking certain discs than many other players but there are a few things to look for that gives a disc a higher propensity for griplock. Discs that have very deep rims are prime candidates for this type of a problem, especially for players with smaller hands. The XL, Teebird, Archangel, Apache, as well as many midrange discs and putters are all quite deep from the bottom of the rim to the flight plate and require more finger to be in contact with the edge of the disc and the rim to get a good grip. This makes it more difficult for the disc to leave your hand cleanly and can result in throws that are pulled to the right. Most of the midrange/approach discs are also fairly narrow so they are less problematic in regards to griplock.


    Your pinky isn't leaving the disc cleanly upon release.
    Possible Fix:
    If you have too much pressure between your pinky finger and the disc, the disc may "stick" and release late with a pull to the right. This can be alleviated in a couple of grip modifications. The first is to lower the contact point of your pinky on the rim. If your pinky is usually pressed near where the flight plate meets the rim, move it down and have the pinky apply pressure closer to the bottom of the rim. This should help the disc pull out more easily. Another possibility that is more difficult but possibly stronger in the long run is to press your pinky on top of your ring finger rather than directly on the disc.

    The problem is something else.
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    Backhand Drives
    The course I play is very windy and I often end up to the right.

    Headwinds will naturally turn discs over to the right. Wind is going to effect your play but it does't have to ruin your fun. Keep in mind these are all referring to a headwind. Reverse these tips for tailwinds.

    Possible Causes
  • Throw the disc with more of a hyzer angle.
  • Keep your throws low into the wind.
  • Throw a heavier disc.
  • Throw a more overstable disc.


    Throw the disc with more of a hyzer angle.
    Possible Fix:
    Since a headwind will turn a disc thrown flat or anhyzer, try throwing with a hyzer angle or adding more hyzer angle to your current throw. Hopefully you can find an angle for a given wind intensity that will have the disc flatten out and flying straight.


    Keep your throws low into the wind.
    Possible Fix:
    Headwinds cause discs to rise as well as turn over. Keeping your throw low to the ground (under 10') will help to minimize the effect of the wind on the disc. When the wind is strong the disc will act as a sail if it gets way up in the air and also has more time to go off in any which way before landing.


    Throw a heavier disc.
    Possible Fix:
    Lighter discs will naturally be more effected by the wind, as will larger diameter discs. Throwing fast and heavy discs should help you have more control into the wind and be tougher to turn over but they will also make you lose some distance. For tailwinds, however, lighter discs will go further.


    Throw a more overstable disc.
    Possible Fix:
    Since the wind will naturally try to turn your disc to the right, overstable discs with a strong left fade will help to counteract this. Wind takes a lot of experience before you grow accustomed to it, so make sure you experiment with discs of different stability so you can find out what works best into different wind directions and strengths.

    The problem is something else.
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    Backhand Drives
    All of my throws have a slight anhyzer and I can't fix it.



    Possible Causes
  • You are leaning backwards slightly during release.
  • You have the disc too far out from your body during your pull-through.
  • You are rolling your wrist over during release.
  • You have the nose of the disc too far down.
  • You have improper disc orientation and/or disc pivot angle.


    You are leaning backwards slightly during release.
    Possible Fix:
    A common cause of anhyzer tendency is an off-balance pull and follow-through. If you are leaned backwards or on your heels during your whip there will be a natural tendency to jerk the outter edge of the disc upwards resulting in an anhyzer release. Making sure you are balanced and on the balls of your feet should help fix this but you may also want to consider the angle of your back.


    You have the disc too far out from your body during your pull-through.
    Possible Fix:
    Having the disc close to your body during your throw is necessary for maximum power and snap. If you get your arm too far away from your body it will slow your body rotation and rob you of power, but more importantly it gives a tendency to pull the outter edge of the disc resulting in an anhyzer tendency.


    You are rolling your wrist over during release.
    Possible Fix:
    Wrist roll is your tendency to turn your wrist/forearm during or immediately after release. This usually happens when your arm is moving very fast so it might be a tough one to spot. If you go through your motion in slow-motion, open your hand like you are going to shake hands with someone. On a release with no wrist roll your palm should be facing somewhat towards you. This is ideal for a line drive shot. If your palm is facing up, you are rolling your wrist over. The result of this is that discs are more likely to turn over and may cause anhyzer tendency. The timing and magnitude of the roll will effect the flight and severe early wrist rolls can lead to grip lock or unintentional rollers. Wrist roll over is often used on a throw like a roll curve, but it won't work as well for a straight throw. On the other end of things, rolling the wrist too far under is shown with the palm facing down. This will expose the flight plate and give a very hard hyzer.


    You have the nose of the disc too far down.
    Possible Fix:
    This is usually not that severe a problem but it might cause undesired turnover. The most critical angle for nose down is during the disc pivot. Do a slow motion throw and pay attention to the back end of the disc through your throw. If the back edge is much higher than the front, you might want to lower it a bit. The farther the nose down, the easier it is to have a disc flip or incidental anhyzer frm the release point.


    You have improper disc orientation and/or disc pivot angle.
    Possible Fix:
    Disc pivot is a tricky one to explain but I will do my best. Newer players often think that the disc will leave your hand exactly as it is at the point of release. This is true if you are letting go of the disc, but a correct grip and throw will have the disc ripping out of your hand by pivoting off between your last finger on the rim and your thumb. You can simulate this by holding the disc with your grip and pulling it slowly out of your hand. Pause at the last place you find your hand touching and that is your disc pivot point. Notice how the disc lurches a little upwards and to the left. If you hold the disc without any hyzer/anhyzer angle and the nose down as it enters the pivot, the resulting up/left lurch will shift the disc into an anhyzer angle upon release. To have the disc pivot off flat nose-down angle, you will want to orient the disc with a slight hyzer angle. You can experiment with angle by simulating a disc pivot and with a little practice you should be able to find the angle that works best for you to have the disc release flat or hyzer.

    The problem is something else.
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    Backhand Drives
    My technique is fine but it still goes right, could it be the disc?



    Possible Causes
  • Your disc is too understable.
  • Your disc is too light.


    Your disc is too understable.
    Possible Fix:
    Although I'm big on finesse, sometimes you just outgrow discs. If you are getting a good bit of snap and you are throwing something very understable such as a Stingray or Stratus, it's probably time to bump up to something a little faster and more stable.


    Your disc is too light.
    Possible Fix:
    Although I'm big on finesse, sometimes you just outgrow discs. Lighter discs generally fly a bit further but if you are getting a good bit of snap and you are throwing something 150 class or in the low 160's, it may very well be time for you to bump up to something a little heavier. Don't go too heavy but something in the mid-high 160's or very low 170's shouldn't be too much of a stretch if you are starting to build up your power.

    The problem is something else.
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