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Disc Review



Midrange & Approach Problems

Midrange & Approach
When I try to throw my midranges off the tee they turn over and dive hard right.
  • I'm throwing them just like I throw my drivers.
  • I am throwing with finesse but the disc still flutters and turns over.
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    Midrange & Approach
    I'm throwing them just like I throw my drivers.

    Possible Causes
  • You are overpowering the disc.
  • You need to the disc with more height.


    You are overpowering the disc.
    Possible Fix:
    If the disc flutters and/or dives hard to the right you are throwing with too much power and not enough finesse. Each disc has a specific amount of spin required for each speed to fly straight and if you have too much speed and not enough spin the disc is going to turn over, and with midranges, usually go hard right.

    If you are throwing a midrange disc like you throw your drivers, chances are you need to shorten up. Your main concern should be shortening your reach back. If your driving form has a lot of reach, try reaching halfway. As long as you have good upper-body rotation you will get enough spin and force on the disc for it to fly straight. Most midrange discs are the 7-irons of disc golf. You need to hit them like you would a 7-iron. If you have a long x-step you may want to consider taking smaller steps. If you have a lot of shoulder turn during your reach you may want to turn less. You may want to even try eliminating the x-step and taking 1 step or no steps at all. Place your concentration on being smooth and firm and your midrange game should improve drastically. If you try to power or strong-arm shots you can almost guarentee they are going to dive hard right.


    You need to the disc with more height.
    Possible Fix:
    As with all discs that get turned over, they require height to flex out and fade. Midrange discs tend to have less natural lift than most of today's high speed drivers. Keep this in mind if you are throwing your midranges very low and try throwing them a bit higher. Make sure you still keep the nose down. I've found the easiest way to accomplish this is to move my pull line up from my upper abdomen/lower chest to around the height of my neck. Remember to use finesse when throwing and you shouldn't have a turnover problem with most midrange discs.

    The problem is something else.
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    Midrange & Approach
    I am throwing with finesse but the disc still flutters and turns over.

    Possible Causes
  • Your grip is not generating enough spin.
  • You are not getting a clean release.
  • You need to throw with even more finesse.


    Your grip is not generating enough spin.
    Possible Fix:
    Many players favor a modified grip for throwing their midranges, often without having all 4 fingers under the rim with the most common being the control grip which has the index finger resting on the edge of the disc. These grips often don't generate the amount of spin on the disc that a grip with the index finger on the rim can. Couple this with the fact that many of the popular midrange discs are larger diameter and throw in some general physics which tell you that larger diameter discs are going to require more force to get them to spin as fast as a smaller diamtere disc and it breaks down to a simple speed exceeding spin problem. Your work is now cut out to do whatever it takes to generate more spin. Grip, wrist bounce, etc.


    You are not getting a clean release.
    Possible Fix:
    A common trend with midrange discs is a very deep rim configuration. Learning to adjust your grip and feel for the disc in order for the disc to release without flutter is important. If you have the spin but the clean release isn't there you will get the same effect of flutter and understability. You might want to experiment with thumb placement, grip strength, finger placement, wrist angle, etc. in order to see where you can clean it up.


    You need to throw with even more finesse.
    Possible Fix:
    If the disc flutters and/or dives hard to the right you are throwing with too much power and not enough finesse. Each disc has a specific amount of spin required for each speed to fly straight and if you have too much speed and not enough spin the disc is going to turn over, and with midranges, usually go hard right. You should try to shorten up your motion. Focus on quickness and fluidity over power. If you have already shortened up and are still having this problem, try shortening up even more. Eliminate the wasted motion, stay light on your feet, and try to be as quick and smooth as possible.

    The problem is something else.
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    Midrange & Approach
    I always seem to over or under throw on approaches.
  • I find myself overthrowing my approaches.
  • I find myself underthrowing my approaches.
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    Midrange & Approach
    I find myself overthrowing my approaches.

    Possible Causes
  • You are using too full of a motion.
  • Your aim is at the wrong point of reference.
  • You are throwing too long of a disc.


    You are using too full of a motion.
    Possible Fix:
    When throwing approach shots generally you should try to have a good firm throw but with a compacted motion. If you are overthrowing approaches, try to shorten everything up in your motion. If you throw with an x-step, take shorter steps or remove the x-step in favor of a single step or no step approach. Shorten your reach back as much as you can and you may find yourself needing to reduce your shoulder turn. If you grip is very tight, you might want to loosen it a bit, but make sure it is still firm. Try to throw everything firm. If it is too much power, try to compact your motion even more so you can still throw firm but for less distance. If you try throw "soft," it will more than likely be inaccurate as your body isn't used to it and discs aren't designed to fly that way. Find the minimum motion you can use and still have a firm, accurate, smooth throw.


    Your aim is at the wrong point of reference.
    Possible Fix:
    Never expect to sink shots outside of your own reasonable range. If you take a run at the chains from 150' it might look flashy, but miss and you'll find yourself 60' past the goal. Discs wil slide and/or skip when they hit the ground. They also curl to the left. A great upshot lands just short and a little to the right of the goal before it curls to the left and parks you. Your focus should be to end up within 5' of the basket. Consistency wins tournaments. Do what you know you can do the majority of the time.


    You are throwing too long of a disc.
    Possible Fix:
    Everyone has their favorite midrange. Whether or not it is the best disc for your shot is another thing. Some very good golfers have given the advice to throw your shortest, slowest disc you can to reach your destination. You should try to throw all of your shots firm. Discs are designed to fly with a firm throw. If you find yourself trying to throw a longer disc softer, don't. Pick a shorter disc and throw it firm. Throw your putter whenever you can get it there. Save your midranges for shots you cannot reach with your putter. Save your drivers for shots you cannot reach with your midranges. Slower discs are more accurate and will have less fade and a smaller margin of error.

    The problem is something else.
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    Midrange & Approach
    I find myself underthrowing my approaches.

    Possible Causes
  • You are throwing soft and loose rather than firm with a compacted motion.
  • You are throwing with too loose a grip.
  • You are understimating the distance of hyzer approaches.


    You are throwing soft and loose rather than firm with a compacted motion.
    Possible Fix:
    Discs are designed to fly straight when thrown firm. Discs will have unpredictable fade when they are thrown soft. Compact your motion as much as you can to get your disc there with a firm throw. With practice you will find it more accurate than a soft throw with a full motion and hopefully you won't find yourself underthrowing as much. You should also try to throw your the shortest disc you have that can get you to your destination. It will be more accurate in the long run.


    You are throwing with too loose a grip.
    Possible Fix:
    Many people try to "finesse" their shots by throwing softer. Often they let their grip go loose. Make sure your grip remains firm and make adjustments in other parts of your motion. A loose grip is going to lead to many approaches that pull up short and left. You don't need to necessarily grip the disc as hard as you can, but it should not be loose when the disc leaves your hand.


    You are understimating the distance of hyzer approaches.
    Possible Fix:
    I know many players that throw sweeping hyzer approaches whenver they can as they are more accurate and predictable for them. A common misconception is the power required for a sweep hyzer line. if you are throwing a 150' approach and you want to put the disc 25' out to the right and let it dive 25' back to the left, it is not a 150' throw. It is a 200' throw and you must adjust your power accordingly if you want to reach the basket. Keep this in mind when choosing your disc and line and hopefully it will increase the accuracy of your approaches.

    The problem is something else.
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    Midrange & Approach
    I can throw my putter further than my dedicated midrange discs.

    Possible Causes
  • You are throwing the discs with different techniques.
  • Your midrange discs are too heavy.


    You are throwing the discs with different techniques.
    Possible Fix:
    On occasion I have seen players that throw their putters further than their would be midrange discs and on rare occasion, further than their drivers. After watching them closely I've found they seem to have quite different form when throwing their putter. When going for finesse, your are more likely to have good technique as you will have less wasted motion and cleaner form. If you find yourself outhrowing your midranges with your putter try to focus on the feel of your throws with your putter and do your best to translate it over. If you are getting the same form on both throws and the putter is still going further, your midrange disc is probably too heavy.


    Your midrange discs are too heavy.
    Possible Fix:
    A common trend amongst players is to throw max-weight midrange discs. This is usually due to the tendency to overpower the disc and for greater predictability which you could also read as "less chance of turning it over." If you find you have the finesse to throw your putter a long ways and aren't able to get the same distance out of a max-weight midrange disc, experiment with lighter mids. Many of the popular midrange discs are larger diameter and range in weights of 180g and sometimes higher. If you are able to finesse your discs enough you probably don't have to worry about turning over a very light midrange disc. Experiment with midranges in the 165-172g range and see what works best for you. There's nothing wrong with throwing a max weight mid into a headwind, but in calm conditions or with a tailwind the lighter disc will go further with less effort as heavy slow discs have a high drag coefficient and gravity will exert a greater force upon them.

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    Midrange & Approach
  • I don't have problems turning over my midrange discs but I also can't throw them far.

    Midrange and approach discs generally are taller and less aerodynamic than drivers. These discs are slower and more stable than drivers and require a slightly different approach to throwing them far. Low-profile drivers use speed to cover the majority of their flight and their glide characteristics to cover the distance after the disc begins to slow down. Midrange discs are slow to begin with but usually have much better glide than a driver. To take advantage of this glide, midrange discs should be thrown higher and with the nose down. Max distance throws with putters often occur with extremely high hyzer shots with the nose down. Throwing high with the nose down may take some adjustment but practice if you practice it enough you may find yourself able to really rip em out there.

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